Foundation for Advancement in Cancer Therapy

Non-Traditional Approaches to
the Theories, Treatments and Prevention of Cancer

Avocado

November 4, 2019

There are over 400 varieties of avocado. Some have smooth skin and are green, and some are rough and black. The avocado is considered a neutral fruit, because it blends well with almost any flavor and mixes well with either vegetables or fruit.

The avocado came from Persia. It has been popular in South America, Central America, and Mexico for centuries. The ancient Aztecs left evidence that the avocado was in their diet. as did the Mayans and Incas. It is known that the avocado was eaten by Jamaicans in the seventeenth century. This fruit grows wild in tropical America today, but is primarily grown as a crop in southern California.

THERAPEUTIC VALUE

Avocado at its peak contains a high amount of fruit oil. Fruit oil is a rare clement, and it gives avocado its smooth, mellow taste and nut-like flavor. Fruit oil also gives the avocado its high food energy value. Unlike most fruit, it contains very few carbohydrates.

The avocado contains fourteen minerals, all of which regulate body functions and stimulate growth. Especially noteworthy are its iron and copper contents, which aid in red blood regeneration and the prevention of nutritional anemia. It also contains sodium and potassium, which give this fruit a high alkaline reaction.

The avocado contains no starch, little sugar, and has some fiber or cellulose.

NUTRIENTS IN ONE POUND

Calories: 568

Protein: 7.1 g

Fat: 55.8 g

Carbohydrates: 21.4 g

Calcium: 34 mg

Phosphorus: 143 mg

Iron: 2.0 mg

Vitamin A: 990 I.U.

Thiamine: 0.37 mg

Riboflavin: 0.67 mg

Niacin: 5.4 mg

Ascorbic acid: 48 mg

Pumpkin

October 28, 2019

The pumpkin, along with other squashes, is native to Americas. The stems, seeds, and parts of the fruit of the pumpkin have been found in the ruins of the ancient cliff dwellings in the southwestern part of the United States. Other discoveries in these ruins indicate that the pumpkin may even have been grown by the “basket makers”, whose civilization precedes that of the cliff dwellers, and who were probably the first agriculturists in North America.

Present varieties of pumpkin have been traced back to the days of Indian tribes. One variety, The Cushaw, was being grown by the Indians in 1586.

Botanically, a pumpkin is a squash. The popular term pumpkin has become a symbol, or tradition, at Halloween and Thanksgiving. The tradition dates as far back as the first colonial settlers.

Pumpkin can be served as a boiled or baked vegetable and as a filling for pies or in custards. It also makes a good ingredient for cornbread.

Pumpkins are grown throughout the United States and are used in or near the producing area. They are classed as stock feed and pie types, some serving both purposes. The principal producers are Indiana, Illinois, New Jersey, Maryland, Iowa, and California. They may be found in stores from late August to March, the peak months being October through December.

Pumpkins of quality should be heavy for their size and free of blemishes, with a hard rind. Watch for decay if the flesh has been bruised or otherwise injured. Decay may appear as a water-soaked area, sometimes covered with a dark, mold-like growth.

THERAPEUTIC VALUE

Pumpkins are very high in potassium and sodium and have a moderately low carbohydrate content. They are alkaline in reaction and are affair source of vitamins Band C. Pumpkins are good in soft diets.

Pumpkin can be used in pudding or it can be liquefied. One of the best ways to serve pumpkin is to bake it. Pumpkin seeds and onions mixed together with a little soy milk make a great remedy for parasitic worms in the digestive tract. To make this remedy, liquefy three tablespoons of pumpkin seeds that have been soaked for three hours, one-half of a small onion, one half cupsoy milk, and one teaspoon of honey. Take this amount three times daily, three days in a row.

NUTRIENTS IN ONE POUND (without rind and seeds)

Calories: 83

Protein: 3.8 g

Fat: 0.3 g

Carbohydrates: 20.6 g

Calcium: 66 mg

Phosphorus: 138 mg

Iron: 2.5 mg

Vitamin A: 5,080 I.U.

Thiamine: .15 mg

Riboflavin: .35 mg

Niacin: 1.8 mg

Ascorbic acid: 30 mg

Onion

October 14, 2019

Onions are believed to have originated in Asia. When the Israeli’s were in the wilderness after being led out of Egypt by Moses, they yearned for onions and other vegetables they were used to eating. Onions were used by the Egyptians as offerings to their gods. They were fed to the workmen who built the pyramids, and Alexander the Great gave onions to his troops to promote their valor.

The odoriferous onion and the dainty lily are members of the same family, Liliaceae. The substance that gives the onion its distinctive odor and flavor is a volatile sulfurous oil which is about half eliminated by boiling. This volatile oil is what causes tears. Holding onions under cold water while peeling them prevents the oil fumes from rising, so use water and spare your handkerchief.

Onions lose approximately 27% of their original ascorbic acid (vitamin C) after five minutes of boiling.

There are two classes of onions—strong and mild. The early grown onions are generally milder in flavor and odor and are preferred for raw use. Each of these two classes can be again categorized into four colors—red, brown, white and yellow. The white onions are the mildest. Each has many varieties.

Onions are also further divided by size for different uses. The smallest size is the pickling onion, also knows as pearl or button onion, and is not more than one inch thick. The next size is the boiling onion, which is usually an inch to two inches in diameter. The next larger size is preferred for chopping or grating. The very large Spanish or Bermuda onions are mild and sweet and good for slicing. They average two and one-half to two and three-quarters inches in diameter. In the trade, the term Valencia is used to mean Spanish-type yellow onions. The globe and flat-type yellow onions are generally referred to as yellows, and white onions of the globe and semi-globe types are generally referred to as whites.

Texas is the main early spring producer; California and Texas the main late spring states; California and New Jersey the most important early summer producers; and New York, Michigan, Minnesota, Colorado, California, Idaho, and Oregon the principal late summer states.

THERAPEUTIC VALUE

Onions are one of the earliest known food medicines, and were used for hundreds of years for colds and catarrhal disorders and to drive fermentations and impurities out of the system. The liquid from a raw onion that has been chopped up fine, covered with honey, and left standing for four or five hours, makes an excellent cough syrup. It is wonderful for soothing an inflamed throat. Onion packs on the chest have been used for years in bronchial inflammations.

Onions contain a large amount of sulfur and are especially good for the liver. As a sulfur food, they mix best with proteins, as they stimulate the action of the amino acids to the brain and nervous system. Whenever onions are eaten, it is a good idea to use greens with them. Parsley especially helps neutralize the effects of the onion sulfur in the intestinal tract.

NUTRIENTS IN ONE POUND

Calories: 157

Protein: 6 g

Fat: 0.4 g

Carbohydrates: 36 g

Calcium: 111 mg

Phosphorus: 149 mg

Iron: 2.1 mg

Vitamin A: 160 I.U.

Thiamine: 0.15 mg

Riboflavin: 0.10 mg

Niacin: 0.6 mg

Ascorbic acid: 38 mg

Broccoli

October 7, 2019

Broccoli was grown in France and Italy in the sixteenth century, but was not well known in this country until 1923, when the D’Arrigo Brothers Company made a trial planting of Italian sprouting broccoli in California. A few crates of this were sent to Boston, and by 1925 the market was well established. Since then, the demand for broccoli has been steadily on the increase.

Broccoli is a member of the cabbage family. California, Arizona, and Texas are the main broccoli-producing states.

When choosing broccoli, look for tenderness in the stalk, especially the upper portion. If the lower portion of the stalk is tough and woody, and if the bud dusters are open and yellow, the b m – wli is over-mature and will be tough. Fresh broccoli does not keep, so purchase only as much as you can immediately use.

Broccoli is often gas-forming, but if cooked in a steamer or over a very low fire, this may be avoided. Broccoli is best if under-cooked, because the more green that is left in broccoli, the more chlorophyll will be left to counteract the sulfur compounds that form gas.

THERAPEUTIC VALUE

All of the foods in the cabbage family, including broccoli, are best if eaten with proteins, because the combination helps drive amino acids to the brain. Broccoli is high in vitamins A and C, and is low in calories. It is beneficial to the eliminative system.

NUTRIENTS IN ONE POUND

Calories: 103

Protein: 9.1 g

Fat: 0.6 g

Carbohydrates: 15.2 g

Calcium: 360 mg

Phosphorus: 211 mg

Iron: 5.6 mg

Vitamin A: 9,700 I.U.

Thiamine: 0.26 mg

Riboflavin: 0.59 mg

Niacin: 2.5 mg

Ascorbic acid: 327 mg

Artichoke

September 3, 2019

The artichoke is believed to be native to the area around the western and central Mediterranean. The Romans were growing artichokes over 2000 years ago, and used it as a green and a salad plant.

Artichokes were brought to England in 1548, and French settlers planted them in Louisiana in the mid-nineteenth century. California is now the center of the artichoke crop, and its peak season is March, April, and May although the crop is also available in November and December.

The name “artichoke” is derived from the northern Italian words “articiocco” and “articoclos”, which refer to what we know to be a pine cone. The artichoke bud does resemble a pine cone.

There is a variety of vegetable called the Jerusalem artichoke, but it is not a true artichoke. It is a tuberous member of the sunflower family. Here, we refer to the two types of true artichokes, the Cardoon (cone-shaped) and the Globe. The most popular variety is the Green Globe.

The artichoke is a large, vigorous plant. It has long, coarse, spiny leaves that can grow to three feet long. The artichoke plants may grow as high as six feet tall.

A perennial, the artichoke grows best in cool, but not freezing, weather. It likes plenty of water, and rain and fog, so is best suited to the California coast, especially the San Francisco area.

For a good quality artichoke, select one that is compact, plump, and heavy, yields slightly to pressure, and has large, tightly clinging, fleshy leaf scales that are a good color. An artichoke that is brown is old or has been injured. An artichoke is overmature when it is open or spreading, the center is fuzzy or dark pink or purple, and the tips and scales are hard. March, April, and May are the months when the artichoke is most abundant.

The parts of the artichoke that are eaten are the fleshy part of the leaves and heart, and the tender base. Medium-sized artichokes are best—large ones tend to be tough and tasteless. They may be served either hot or cold, and make a delicious salad.

To prepare artichokes, cut off the stem and any tough or damaged leaves. Was the artichoke in cold running water, then place in boiling water, and cook twenty to thirty minutes, or until tender. To make the artichoke easier to eat, remove the choke in the center, pull out the top center leaves, and, with a spoon, remove the thistle-like inside.

To eat artichokes, pull off the petal leaves as you would the petals of a daisy, and bite off the end.

THERAPEUTIC VALUE

Artichoke hearts and leaves have a high alkaline ash. They also have a great deal of roughage, which is not good for those who have inflammation of the bowel. They are good to eat on a reducing diet.

Artichokes contain vitamins A and C, which are good for fighting off infection. They are high in calcium and iron.

NUTRIENTS IN ONE POUND (including inedible parts)

Calories: 60

Protein: 5.3 g

Fat: 0.4 g

Carbohydrates: 19.2 g

Calcium: 93 mg

Phosphorus: 160 mg

Iron: 2.4 mg

Vitamin A: 290 I.U.

Thiamine: 0.14 mg

Riboflavin: 0.09 mg

Niacin: 1.7 mg

Ascorbic acid: 22 mg

Lima Beans

August 19, 2019

Records found in old Peruvian tombs show that lima beans have been around for centuries. European explorers found this vegetable in Lima, Peru, and this is where the name comes from. Lima beans probably originated in Guatemala, and are still grown in tropical regions.

The flourishing dry lima bean industry of southern California seems to have started in 1865. In this year, Henry Lewis bought a few hundred pounds of lima bean seeds from a tramp steamer from Peru that had put in port at Santa Barbara. Most of the dry lima bean crop is produced along the Pacific coast from Santa Ana to Santa Barbara, and Florida is also a large producer of lima beans. The peak months of supply are July through October.

There are two types of lima beans. The large “potato” type have large pods and are fleshy and not likely to split at maturity. The baby lima bean is an annual plant that matures early. The pods are small and numerous, and are likely to split open at maturity.

When selecting lima beans, look for quality pods that are fresh, bright green in color, and well-filled. Lima beans, when shelled, should be plump with tender skins, green to greenish white. The skin should puncture when it is tested. Hard, tough skins mean that the bean is over mature, and these beans usually lack flavor. Lima beans are often called “butter” beans.

THERAPEUTIC VALUE

Lima beans can be used either dry or fresh. Fresh lima beans are alkaline and have high protein value. Dry limas are hard to digest, and the dry skin is irritating to an inflamed digestive system. Lima beans are beneficial to the muscular system.

Lima beans are excellent as a puree in soft diets for stomach disorders. They make a tasty baked dish, such as bean loaf. One pound of lima beans contains as many nutrients as two pounds of meat!

Dry beans have high protein content of almost 18%, but fresh beans are only 4% protein. The kidney bean and navy bean are very similar in makeup and therapeutic value to the lima bean.

NUTRIENTS IN ONE POUND (unshelled)

Calories: 234

Protein: 13.6 g

Fat: 1.5 g

Carbohydrates: 42.8 g

Calcium: 115 mg

Phosphorus: 288 mg

Iron: 4.2 mg

Vitamin A: 520 I.U.

Thiamine: .38 mg

Riboflavin: .21 mg

Niacin: 2.5 mg

Ascorbic acid: 48 mg

Beets

August 12, 2019

The beet has been cultivated for its roots and leaves since the third or fourth century B.C. It spread from the area of the Mediterranean to the Near East. In ancient times it was used only for medicinal purposes-the edible beet root we know today was unknown before the Christian era. In the fourth century beet recipes were recorded in England, and in 1810 the beet began to be cultivated for sugar in France and Germany. It is not known when the beet was first introduced to the United States, but it is known that there was one variety grown here in 1806. Sugar beets are usually yellowish-white, and are cultivated extensively in this country. The garden beet ranges from dark purplish-red to a bright vermillion to white, but the most popular commercial variety is red.

Beets are available in the markets all year. Their peak season is May through October. They are primarily grown in the southern United States, the Northeast, and the vest coast states. When selecting beets, do not just look at the condition of the leaves. Beets that remain to the ground too long become tough and woody, and can be identified by a short neck, deep scars, or several circles of leaf scars around the top of the beet.

THERAPEUTIC VALUE

Beets are wonderful for adding needed minerals. They can be used to eliminate pocket add material in the bowel and for ailments in the gall bladder and liver. Their vitamin A content is quite high, so they are not only good for the eliminative system, but also benefit the digestive and lymphatic systems.

NUTRIENTS IN ONE POUND (without tops)

Calories: 147

Protein: 5.4 g

Fat: 0.3 g

Carbohydrates: 32.6 g

Calcium: 51 mg

Phosphorus: 92 mg

Iron: 3.4 mg

Vitamin A: 22,700 I.U.

Thiamine: 0.07 mg

Riboflavin: 0.16 mg

Niacin: 1.5 mg

Ascorbic acid: 80 mg

Radish

August 5, 2019

The radish is a member of the mustard family, but is also related to cabbage, cauliflower, kale, and turnips. After this vegetable was introduced into Middle Asia from China in prehistoric times, many forms of the plant were developed. Radishes are a cool season crop, and the peak period is April through July. The American varieties can be used for both roots and tops in salads, and cooked.

A good-quality radish is well-formed, smooth, firm, tender, and crisp, with a mild flavor. The condition of the leaves does not always indicate quality, for they may be fresh, bright, and green, while the radishes may be spongy and strong, or the leaves may be wilted and damaged in handling, while the radishes themselves may be fresh and not at all pithy. Old, slow-growing radishes are usually strong in flavor, with a woody flesh. Slight finger pressure will disclose sponginess or pithiness.

THERAPEUTIC VALUE

Radishes are strongly diuretic and stimulate the appetite and digestion. The juice of raw radishes is helpful in catarrhal conditions. The mustard oil content of the radish makes it good for expelling gallstones from the bladder.

A good cocktail can be made with radishes. This cocktail will eliminate catarrhal congestion in the body, especially in the sinuses. It will also aid in cleansing the gall bladder and liver. To make this cocktail, combine one-third cucumber juice, one-third radish juice, and one-third green pepper juice. If desired, apple juice may be added to make this more palatable. An excellent cocktail for nervous disorders is made from radish juice, prune juice, and rice polishings. This drink is high in vitamin B and aids in the flow of bile.

NUTRIENTS IN ONE POUND

Calories: 49

Protein: 2.9g

Fat: .3g

Carbohydrates: 10.3g

Calcium: 86mg

Phosphorus: 89mg

Iron: 2.9mg

Vitamin A: 30 I.U.

Thiamine: .09mg

Riboflavin: .09mg

Niacin: .9mg

Ascorbic Acid: 74mg

Cucumber

July 15, 2019

The cucumber is said to be native to India, although plant explorers have never been able to discover a wild prototype. Cucumbers have been cultivated for thousands of years, and records indicate that they were used as food in ancient Egypt, and were a popular vegetable with the Greeks and Romans. The cucumber is one of the few vegetables mentioned in the Bible.

In 200 B.C. a Chinese ambassador traveled as far as Persia, where he saw cucumbers for the first time. Later, he brought the to China. At a later date, an English sea captain, returning from the West Indies, brought back pickled gherkins to Mrs. Samuel Pepys. Shortly after this period, cucumbers were grown in England.

Occasionally, in a collection of old glass, a plain glass tube or cylinder resembling a lamp chimney with parallel sides will tum up. This may be an English cucumber glass, a device used at one time to make cucumbers grow straight. George Stephenson, inventor of the locomotive, is credited with its invention.

Florida is the principal producer of cucumbers, supplying al­ most one-third of the total United States commercial crop for mar­ ket. California, North and South Carolina, New Jersey, and New York are also large producers.

Cucumbers for slicing should be firm, fresh, bright, well­ shaped, and of good medium or dark green color. The flesh should be firm and the seeds immature. Withered or shriveled cucumbers should be avoided. Their flesh is generally tough or rubbery and somewhat bitter. Over maturity is indicated by a generally over­ grown, puffy appearance. The color of over mature cucumbers is generally dull and not infrequently yellowed, the flesh is tough, the seeds hard, and the flesh in the seed cavity almost jelly-like. Cu­ cumbers in this condition should not be used for slicing. Some varieties are of solid green color when mature enough for slicing. but usually a little whitish color will be found at the tip, with a tendency to extend in lines along the seams, where they advance from pale green to white, and finally yellow with age.

THERAPEUTIC VALUE

Cucumbers are alkaline, non-starchy vegetables. They are a cooling food, especially when used in vegetable juices. Long ago it was believed that people would die from eating the peelings, but this is not true.

Cucumbers are wonderful as a digestive aid, and have a purify­ing effect on the bowel. It is not necessary to soak them in salt water. Serve them thinly sliced, raw, in sour cream, lemon juice, or yogurt for a delightful summer dish. They have a marvelous effect on the skin, and the old saying ”keeping cool as a cucumber” is literally true because of its cooling effect on the blood.

NUTRIENTS IN ONE POUND

Calories: 39

Protein: 2.2 g

Fat: 0.3 g

Carbohydrates: 8.6 g

Calcium: 32 mg

Phosphorus: 67 mg

Iron: 1.0 mg

Vitamin A: 0 I.U.

Thiamine: 0.11 mg

Riboflavin: 0.14 mg

Niacin: 0.7 mg

Ascorbic Acid: 27 mg

Tomato

July 8, 2019

It is believed that the present type of tomato is descended from a species no larger than marbles, that grew thousands of years ago. The tomato is native to the Andean region of South America and was under cultivation in Peru in the sixteenth century at the time of the Spanish conquest. Before the end of the sixteenth century, the people of England and the Netherlands were eating and enjoying tomatoes. The English called it the “love apple,” and English romancers presented it as a token of affection; Sir Walter Raleigh is said to have presented one to Queen Elizabeth.

M. F. Corne is credited with being the first man to eat a tomato. His fellow citizens of Newport, Rhode Island, erected a monument to him, because the tomato was considered poisonous until Mr. Corne dared to eat one.

By cultivation and use the tomato is a vegetable; botanically, it is a fruit, and can be classified as a berry, being pulpy and containing one or more seeds that are not stones. It is considered a citric acid fruit and is in the same classification as oranges and grapefruit. Some oxalic acid is also contained in the tomato.

Consumption of tomatoes is on the increase. They are the third most important vegetable crop on the basis of market value; the first is potatoes. Tomatoes are produced in all states. In order of importance, the producers are: Texas, California, Florida, Ohio, and Tennessee. In the first four month~ of the year heavy shipments are imported from Mexico and Cuba. Fresh tomatoes are available all year, either from domestic production or imports. June and August are the peak months.

Tomatoes number greatly in variety, but it is estimated that only sixteen varieties are included in 90 percent of all tomatoes grown in the United States. Their characteristic colors range from pink to scarlet. A white tomato has recently been developed that is supposed to be acid-free. A good, mature tomato is neither overripe nor soft, but well developed, smooth, and free from decay, cracks, or bruises. Spoiled tomatoes should be separated immediately from the sound ones or decay will quickly spread.

If fresh, ripe tomatoes are unavailable, canned tomato and canned tomato juice are fine substitutes. It is preferable to use tomato puree, rather than canned tomatoes put up in water. Puree contains more vitamins and minerals.

Tomatoes are best when combined with proteins. Use tomatoes in both fruit and vegetable salads. They are cooling and refreshing in beverages, and are especially good as a flavoring for soups. Tomatoes can be used to give color, and make green salads more inviting.

Tomato juice should be used very soon after it has been drawn from the tomato, or after the canned juice is opened. If it is opened and left that way, it will lose much of its mineral value, because it oxidizes very quickly.

Tomatoes should be picked ripe, as the acids of the green tomato are very detrimental to the body and very hard on the kidneys. Many of the tomatoes today are grown in hothouses and are picked too green and allowed to ripen on their way to the markets or in cold storage plants built for this purpose. If the seeds, or the internal part of the tomato, is still green, while the outside is red, this is an indication that the fruit has been picked too green.

THERAPEUTIC VALUE

The tomato is not acid forming; it contains a great deal of citric acid but is alkaline forming when it enters the bloodstream. It increases the alkalinity of the blood and helps remove toxins, especially uric acid, from the system. As a liver cleanser, tomatoes are wonderful, especially when used with the green vegetable juices.

In many of the sanitariums in Europe tomatoes are used as a poultice for various conditions in the body. There is a mistaken belief that tomatoes are not good for those who have rheumatism and gout. People with these conditions should mix tomato juice with other vegetable juices to avoid a reaction that may be too strong.

Whenever the blood is found to be stagnant in any part of the body, a tomato poultice is wonderful as a treatment in removing that stagnation. It acts as a dissolving agent or solvent.

Tomatoes are very high in vitamin value. They are wonderful as a blood cleanser, and excellent in elimination diets. However, they should not be used to excess on a regular basis. Tomato juice can be used in convalescent diets, in combination with other raw vegetable juices such as celery, parsley, beet, and carrot juice.

NUTRIENTS IN ONE POUND

Calories: 97

Protein: 4.5g

Fat: 0.9g

Carbohydrates: 17.7g

Calcium: 50mg

Phosphorus: 123mg

Iron: 2.7mg

Vitamin A: 4,0801.U.

Thiamine: 0.23mg

Riboflavin: 0.15mg

Niacin: 3.2mg

Ascorbic acid: 102mg

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