Foundation for Advancement in Cancer Therapy
Non-Toxic Biological Approaches to the Theories,
Treatments and Prevention of Cancer

2023
Our 53rd Year

Foods of the Week

  • The history and nutrients of Spinach

    March 25, 2019 - Category: Foods of the Week

    Spinach is a small, fleshy-leaved annual of the goosefoot family. It is a quick-maturing, cool season crop that is hardy and will live outdoors over winter thoughout most of the area from New Jersey southward along the Atlantic Coast and in most parts of the lower South. Spinach has been both praised and abused. It…The history and nutrients of Spinach

  • The origins and nutrients of an Orange

    January 28, 2019 - Category: Foods of the Week

    The orange is one of the oldest fruits known in the history of cultivation. As early as 500 B.C. the fruit of the citrus tree was mentioned in a collection of old documents believed to be edited by Confucius himself. In the year A.D. 1178, Han Yen-Chi, a Chinese horticulturist, wrote on the subject of…The origins and nutrients of an Orange

  • The origins and nutrients of Grapefruit

    January 7, 2019 - Category: Foods of the Week

    The name "grapefruit" originated in the West Indies in the eighteenth century, perhaps because of the fact that its fruit grows in clusters of three to twelve or more, similar to grape clusters. This citrus fruit was cultivated more than 4000 years ago in India and Malaysia, but it was not until the sixteenth century…The origins and nutrients of Grapefruit

  • The history and nutrients in Pomegranate

    December 31, 2018 - Category: Foods of the Week

    Mohammad once told his followers: "Eat the pomegranate, for it purges the system of envy and hatred." The pomegranate is one of the oldest fruits known to man. Frequent references to it are found in the Bible and in ancient Sanskrit writings. Homer mentions it in his Odyssey, and it appears in the story of…The history and nutrients in Pomegranate

  • The history and nutrient value of Cranberry

    December 17, 2018 - Category: Foods of the Week

    Cranberries are native to the swampy regions of both the temperate and arctic zones of North America and Europe. Because they grow on slender, curved stalks, suggesting the neck of a crane, they were named "crane-berry". or "cranberry". Long before the first colonists arrived in this country the cranberry was in common use by the…The history and nutrient value of Cranberry

  • Facts about Chicory

    December 3, 2018 - Category: Foods of the Week

    Chicory is closely related to endive. There are many varieties to chicory. They include green chicory, which is leafy; and radicchio, also a root chicory, which is red and white. Chicory is best when tossed in salad with other vegetables. Green chicory is cultivated primarily in Europe, although varieties grow wild in Europe, Africa, Asia,…Facts about Chicory

  • Facts about Brussels Sprouts

    November 26, 2018 - Category: Foods of the Week

    Brussels sprouts are said to be native to Brussels, Belgium. They were cultivated in England early in the nineteenth century. Brussels sprouts were not extensively cultivated in this country until the early twentieth century, and were first grown in the delta region of Louisiana. Brussels sprouts are a member of the cabbage family. The plant…Facts about Brussels Sprouts

  • Facts about Swiss Chard

    October 8, 2018 - Category: Foods of the Week

    Swiss chard is a member of the beet family. Unlike most members of this family, chard does not develop an enlarged, fleshy root. Instead it has large leaves with thickened midribs, and both ribs and leaves are edible. The roots are hard and woody. Swiss chard is a temperate zone biennial that withstands rather severe…Facts about Swiss Chard

  • The history of Celery

    August 27, 2018 - Category: Foods of the Week

    Historically, Celeriac is probably more commonly known as celery root. It is a turnip-rooted vegetable, and the root forms a solid knob just below the soil surface. Italian and Swiss botanists gave the first description of celeriac about 1600. It became popular in Europe in the eighteenth century, but has never been popular in England…The history of Celery

  • The history of the Tomato

    July 23, 2018 - Category: Foods of the Week

    It is believed that the present type of tomato is descended from a species no larger than marbles, that grew thousands of years ago. The tomato is native to the Andean region of South America and was under cultivation in Peru in the sixteenth century at the time of the Spanish conquest. Before the end…The history of the Tomato