Foundation for Advancement in Cancer Therapy

Non-Traditional Approaches to
the Theories, Treatments and Prevention of Cancer

Rethinking Cancer Newsletter #41

July 3, 2013

Filed under: Rethinking Cancer Newsletters — ggrieser @ 6:22 pm

Bravo! Portland, Oregon! On May 21st Portlanders rejected the addition of fluoride chemicals into their public water supplies for the 4th time since 1956. Despite the fact that proponents of the measure outraised the opponents 3-1, voters rejected the plan 60% to 40%!

The chorus of conventional media exclaimed, “What’s the matter with Portland — the only city among the nation’s 30 most populous to NOT approve fluoridation?

The city, which has one of the cleanest water supplies in the country, is one of the most progressive hubs in the nation. What do Portlanders know that the vast majority of Americans doesn’t? Not to mention the fact that the vast majority of countries worldwide has banned the practice of dumping fluoride chemicals — such as hydrofluosilicic acid, a toxic waste product of the phosphate fertilizer and aluminum industries that can, in concentrated form, actually etch glass — into public water supplies under the misguided and unscientific assumption that this will improve dental health. To learn the real story, watch this video of Dr. William Hirzy, Senior Vice President of EPA Headquarters Union of Scientists, read Dr. Connett’s article below and spread the word!

NOTE: We’ve added a new FAQ about the HCG Urinalysis test, including important updated information. Anyone currently taking or interested in taking the test as a way of monitoring their progress on a treatment program is strongly urged to read this.

To your health!
Foundation for Advancement in Cancer Therapy (FACT)

P.S. We do appreciate your continued support and donations! Check out the new lower prices on our ebooks and keep in touch on TwitterFacebook and our YouTube channel!

The Absurdity of Water Fluoridation
By Paul Connett, PhD

Water fluoridation is a peculiarly American phenomenon. It started at a time when Asbestos lined our pipes, lead was added to gasoline, PCBs filled our transformers and DDT was deemed so “safe and effective” that officials felt no qualms spraying kids in school classrooms and seated at picnic tables. One by one all these chemicals have been banned, but fluoridation remains untouched.

For over 50 years U.S. government officials have confidently and enthusiastically claimed that fluoridation is “safe and effective.” However, they are seldom prepared to defend the practice in open public debate. Actually, there are so many arguments against fluoridation that it can get overwhelming. Read More

What’s In a Yawn?

For a long time it was thought that the primary purpose of yawning was to increase oxygen to the circulatory system and the brain in order to improve alertness. In primitive times, the yawn might have silently signaled to others the need to be more alert as one of the group was getting tired and not quite ready for action. In modern times, people tend to feel offended in the presence of a yawner, thinking it a highly rude and irresponsible act of boredom that should be stifled in polite company.

Recent studies, however, indicate that, more important than supplying oxygen, yawning is a natural physical reaction to cool an “overheated” brain. Read More

Vegetarianism for All?
by Ruth Sackman

There’s a popular belief today that if you really care about animals and are serious about health, you should be a pure vegetarian, better yet vegan or raw food-tarian. Drawing on over 40 years of experience, Ruth Sackman (1915-2008), FACT co-founder and former president, saw things differently. Here’s her take on why the completely flesh-free life may not be for everyone.

For some people vegetarianism seems to be a universal truth. Personally, I would prefer to be a vegetarian as I feel a gut sympathy for animals, but I have to face the reality of my years of experience at FACT which have brought me into close contact with so many patients and clinicians. Some patients regain their health as vegetarians and others cannot. Should those who require meat protein jeopardize their health for ethical feelings about the slaughter of animals? I think we have to adjust to the circumstances of life and choose what is indicated for each individual.

The claim by vegetarians that the design of the human body (teeth and digestive system) is equivalent to that of vegetarian animals is not anatomically correct. We do not have the very short digestive tracts of carnivorous animals, but nor do we have the enlarged fermenting sacs of herbivores, like cows with 4 stomach compartments. We have one stomach and a medium length digestive tract, as well as teeth capable of tearing flesh and chewing fine vegetation, while most herbivores lack canines and upper incisors. It would seem that Nature has placed us somewhere in between. It is my view the human system adapts to its environment over generations, thereby rendering some people omnivorous. Nature has the wisdom to make this adjustment in order to sustain life. The offspring of generations of meat-eating ancestors have evolved into omnivorous entities and now require meat in small amounts in order to maintain homeostasis. Read More

Organic Beef & Veggie Salad

  • About 8 oz. freshly-cooked or leftover organic grass-fed steak, sliced very thin (lamb, chicken or other leftover meats from pastured animals can be substituted)
  • 6 cups mixed salad greens, torn in smallish pieces
  • 1 cup fresh herb leaves (mint, cilantro, basil or a combination)
  • ¼ cup minced red onion
  • 1 medium cucumber, peeled and diced
  • 1 small fresh hot red chili, minced
  • juice of 2 limes
  • 1 tablespoon sesame oil or cold-pressed virgin olive oil
  1. In a bowl, toss greens with herbs, onion, cucumber and chili.
  2. Mix lime juice and sesame or olive oil in a small dish for the dressing. Toss half of this with the greens. Transfer greens to a serving platter.
  3. Place the beef slices over the greens. Drizzle with remaining dressing and serve. Makes 4 servings

 

No Comments

No comments yet.

RSS feed for comments on this post. TrackBack URL

Sorry, the comment form is closed at this time.

Watch Online

Watch on Amazon Video Watch on iTunes

Watch on DVD

Get the Book

Rethinking Cancer, by Ruth Sackman, is an excellent companion book to the film. Learn More

Newsletter signup

Bookmark and Share