Foundation for Advancement in Cancer Therapy

Non-Traditional Approaches to
the Theories, Treatments and Prevention of Cancer

Rasberry

June 29, 2020

The red raspberry was first cultivated about 400 years ago on European soil. Cultivation spread to England and the United States, where the native American raspberry was already well known.

In 1845, Dr. Brinkle of Philadelphia became the first successful producer of raspberries in this country, and he originated many varieties. By 1870, this berry had become an important crop in the United States.

The red raspberry is native to the northern United States, and the black raspberry is found in the South. The purple raspberry is a hybrid between the red and the black, and did not become important until about 1900.

The raspberry has a wide range of colors. A yellow is raspberry found growing wild in many areas, particularly in Maryland. The Asiatic species of raspberry has a color that ranges through red, orange, yellow, lavender, purple, wine, to black. Even white berries are found in many species in their wild state. Pink berries have been found in Alabama and Oregon, and lavender ones in North Carolina. In the West, the wild black raspberry is often not quite black, but rather a deep wine in color. The market berry is usually the cultivated berry and is both red and black. There are many varieties of each that are popular. The market runs from supply mid-April through August, and the peak month is July.

A quality berry is plump, with a clean, fresh appearance, a solid, full color, and is usually without adhering caps. Berries with caps attached may be immature. Overripe berries are usually dull in color, soft, and sometimes leaky.

THERAPEUTIC VALUE

Raspberries are considered a good cleanser for mucus, for catarrhal conditions, and for toxins in the body. They are a good source of vitamins A and C. Raspberries leave an alkaline reaction. They should never be eaten with sugar.

Raspberries are wonderful in juice form and can be used as a cocktail before meals, since they stimulate the appetite. Raspberry juice is delicious mixed with other juices.

NUTRIENTS IN ONE POUND

Calories: 177

Protein: 4.2 g

Fat: 0.4 g

Carbohydrates: 42.4 g

Calcium: 254 mg

Phosphorus: 150 mg

Iron: 1.5 mg

Vitamin A: 2,240 I.U.

Thiamine: 0.29 mg

Riboflavin: 0.30 mg

Niacin: 3.6 mg

Ascorbic acid: 166 mg

Swiss Chard

June 22, 2020

Swiss chard is a member of the beet family. Unlike most members of this family, chard does not develop an enlarged, fleshy root. Instead it has large leaves with thickened midribs, and both ribs and leaves are edible. The roots are hard and woody. Swiss chard is a temperate zone biennial that withstands rather severe winters. It is of the same species as garden beets, mangel-wurzels, and sugar beets, and readily inter-crosses with them through airborne pollination.

Chard is the beet of the ancients. Aristotle wrote about red chard and Theophrastus mentioned light-green and dark-green types of chard in the fourth century B.C. The Romans called this plant “beta”, and the Arabs called it “selg”. But chard was used as a potherb in the Mediterranean lands, Asia Minor, the Caucasus, and the Near East, long before Roman times. Wild beets grow widely in these areas.

Beets of the type that produce large, fleshy, edible roots were unknown before the Christian era. The ancients apparently used the root of the wild beet or chard for medicinal purposes only. Chard has been used in Europe for as long as there are definite records of food plants.

THERAPEUTIC VALUE

Swiss chard contains a great deal of vitamin C, vitamin A, potassium, sodium, and calcium. It is best not to cook it for a long time, because its vitamin content will decrease.

This vegetable is low in calories and high in alkaline ash. It is good when combined with other vegetables in salads, and helps ward off colds. It is beneficial to the digestive system, because it contains many of the vitamins and minerals essential to its operation.

NUTRIENTS IN ONE POUND

Calories: 82

Protein: 5.5 g

Fat: 0.8 g

Carbohydrates: 17.2 g

Calcium: 410 mg

Phosphorus: 140 mg

Iron: 9.8 mg

Vitamin A: 10,920 I.U.

Thiamine: 0.22 mg

Riboflavin: 0.28 mg

Niacin: 1.7 mg

Ascorbic acid: 148 mg

Asparagus

June 15, 2020

The ancient Phoenicians brought asparagus to the Greeks and Romans. It was described in the sixteenth century by the English writer Evelyn as “sperage,” and he said that it was “delicious eaten raw with oil and vinegar”.

When selecting asparagus, choose spears that are fresh, firm, and tender (not woody or pithy), with tips that are tightly closed. Watch for signs of decay, such as rot and mold. If the tip of the spear appears wilted, the asparagus is really too old to be good. From the tip to all but an inch of the base, the stalk should be tender. Angular stalks indicate that they are tough and stringy.

Store asparagus wrapped in a damp cloth or waxed paper, and keep refrigerated until you are ready to use it. Asparagus loses its edible quality when it is subjected to dryness and heat, which reduce the sugar content and increase the fiber content.

Asparagus is a perennial herb, and is a member of the Lily of the Valley family. It can be served hot, with drawn butter; cold, in a salad; in soups; and as a sandwich filling or flavoring.

The season for asparagus is February through July, and the peak months are April, May, and June. Early spring asparagus is from California; late spring asparagus is shipped in early April or late May from Maryland, Delaware, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Massachusetts, Michigan, Illinois, and Iowa. Green asparagus is the most nutritious. Some varieties are green-tipped with white butts, and some are entirely white. Most of the white variety is canned.

Asparagus is best when cooked in stainless steel, on low heat. This leaves the shoots tender and retains their original color. If cooked with the tips up, more vitamin B1 and C will be preserved. The liquid can be saved and used in vegetable cocktails.

THERAPEUTIC VALUE

Asparagus acts as a general stimulant to the kidneys, but can be irritating to the kidneys if taken in excess or if there is extreme kidney inflammation. Because it contains chlorophyll, it is a good blood builder.

Green asparagus tips are high in vitamin A, while the white tips have almost none. This food leaves an alkaline ash in the body. Because they have a lot of roughage, only the tips can be used in a soft diet. They are high in water content and are considered a good vegetable in an elimination diet. Many of the elements that build the liver, kidneys, skin, ligaments, and bones are found in green asparagus. Green asparagus also helps in the formation of red blood corpuscles.

NUTRIENTS IN ONE POUND

Calories: 90

Protein: 7.5g

Fat: .7g

Carbohydrates: 13.1g

Calcium: 71mg

Phosphorus: 211mg

Iron: 3.11mg

Vitamin A: 3,430 I.U.

Thiamine: .54mg

Riboflavin: .59mg

Niacin: 3.9mg

Ascorbic Acid: 113mg

Strawberry

June 8, 2020

The strawberry is native to North and South America. An early Chilean variety was taken to Peru in 1557 and this same variety is still growing in Chile, Peru, Ecuador, and other South American countries. The modem strawberry was developed in Europe.

Most strawberry varieties that grow commercially today have originated within the last fifty-five years. Territories for their growth have expanded to almost every state in the Union, including the interior of Alaska.

How the name “strawberry” first came into use is often disputed. One researcher tells us that it was because straw was used between the rows to keep the berries clean and to protect the berries in the winter. Another explanation is that in Europe ripe berries were threaded on straws to be carried to market.

In 1945, about fifteen varieties constituted 94 percent of the total commercial market. The leading variety in the United States is the Blakemore, which originated in Maryland in 1923. Its firmness, earliness, and the fact that it holds its color when stored make it a leading market berry, The Klondike is grown extensively in Southern California and is one of the best shipping varieties. The Klonmore is native to Louisiana. Because it appears earlier, it is more resistant to disease and is fast replacing the Klondike in that state. Other popular varieties are the Howard 17 and the Marshall, which both originated in Massachusetts.

Strawberries are at their peak of abundance in April, May, and June; January, February, March, and July are moderate months.

Quality strawberries are fresh, clean, and bright in appearance. They have a solid red color, and the caps are attached. Strawberries without caps may have been roughly handled or are over-mature.

THERAPEUTIC VALUE

Strawberries are a good source of vitamin C, and contain a large amount of fruit sugar. They are an excellent spring tonic, and are delicious when juiced.

They can be considered an elimination food, and are good for the intestinal tract. Strawberries have an alkaline reaction in the body. Because of their high sodium content, they can be considered “a food of youth.” They also have a good amount of potassium.

Many people complain about getting hives from strawberries. This is usually because they are not ripened on the vine. If you are allergic to strawberries, try this: run hot water over them, then Immediately follow this by running cold water over them. This takes the fuzz off the outside of the berries, which is believed to be the cause of the hives.

The seeds of the strawberry can be irritating in cases of inflammation of the bowel or colitis.

NUTRIENTS IN ONE POUND

Calories: 179

Protein: 3.5 g

Fat: 2.6 g

Carbohydrates: 35.3 g

Calcium: 122 mg

Phosphorus: 118 mg

Iron: 3.5 mg

Vitamin A: 250 I.U.

Thiamine: 0.13 mg

Riboflavin: 0.29 mg

Niacin: 1.3mg

Ascorbic acid: 261 mg

Tomato

June 1, 2020

It is believed that the present type of tomato is descended from a species no larger than marbles, that grew thousands of years ago. The tomato is native to the Andean region of South America and was under cultivation in Peru in the sixteenth century at the time of the Spanish conquest. Before the end of the sixteenth century, the people of England and the Netherlands were eating and enjoying tomatoes. The English called it the “love apple,”  and English romancers presented it as a token of affection; Sir Walter Raleigh is said to have presented one to Queen Elizabeth.

M. F. Corne is credited with being the first man to eat a tomato. His fellow citizens of Newport, Rhode Island, erected a monument to him, because the tomato was considered poisonous until Mr. Corne dared to eat one.

By cultivation and use the tomato is a vegetable; botanically, it is a fruit, and can be classified as a berry, being pulpy and containing one or more seeds that are not stones. It is considered a citric acid fruit and is in the same classification as oranges and grapefruit. Some oxalic acid is also contained in the tomato.

Consumption of tomatoes is on the increase. They are the third most important vegetable crop on the basis of market value; the first is potatoes. Tomatoes are produced in all states. In order of importance, the producers are: Texas, California, Florida, Ohio, and Tennessee. In the first four month~ of the year heavy shipments are imported from Mexico and Cuba. Fresh tomatoes are available all year, either from domestic production or imports. June and August are the peak months.

Tomatoes number greatly in variety, but it is estimated that only sixteen varieties are included in 90 percent of all tomatoes grown in the United States. Their characteristic colors range from pink to scarlet. A white tomato has recently been developed that is supposed to be acid-free. A good, mature tomato is neither overripe nor soft, but well developed, smooth, and free from decay, cracks, or bruises. Spoiled tomatoes should be separated immediately from the sound ones or decay will quickly spread.

If fresh, ripe tomatoes are unavailable, canned tomato and canned tomato juice are fine substitutes. It is preferable to use tomato puree, rather than canned tomatoes put up in water. Puree contains more vitamins and minerals.

Tomatoes are best when combined with proteins. Use tomatoes in both fruit and vegetable salads. They are cooling and refreshing in beverages, and are especially good as a flavoring for soups. Tomatoes can be used to give color, and make green salads more inviting.

Tomato juice should be used very soon after it has been drawn from the tomato, or after the canned juice is opened. If it is opened and left that way, it will lose much of its mineral value, because it oxidizes very quickly.

Tomatoes should be picked ripe, as the acids of the green tomato are very detrimental to the body and very hard on the kidneys. Many of the tomatoes today are grown in hothouses and are picked too green and allowed to ripen on their way to the markets or in cold storage plants built for this purpose. If the seeds, or the internal part of the tomato, is still green, while the outside is red, this is an indication that the fruit has been picked too green.

THERAPEUTIC VALUE

The tomato is not acid forming; it contains a great deal of citric acid but is alkaline forming when it enters the bloodstream. It increases the alkalinity of the blood and helps remove toxins, especially uric acid, from the system. As a liver cleanser, tomatoes are wonderful, especially when used with the green vegetable juices.

In many of the sanitariums in Europe tomatoes are used as a poultice for various conditions in the body. There is a mistaken belief that tomatoes are not good for those who have rheumatism and gout. People with these conditions should mix tomato juice with other vegetable juices to avoid a reaction that may be too strong.

Whenever the blood is found to be stagnant in any part of the body, a tomato poultice is wonderful as a treatment in removing that stagnation. It acts as a dissolving agent or solvent.

Tomatoes are very high in vitamin value. They are wonderful as a blood cleanser, and excellent in elimination diets. However, they should not be used to excess on a regular basis. Tomato juice can be used in convalescent diets, in combination with other raw vegetable juices such as celery, parsley, beet, and carrot juice.

NUTRIENTS IN ONE POUND

Calories: 97

Protein: 4.5g

Fat: 0.9g

Carbohydrates: 17.7g

Calcium: 50mg

Phosphorus: 123mg

Iron: 2.7mg

Vitamin A: 4,0801.U.

Thiamine: 0.23mg

Riboflavin: 0.15mg

Niacin: 3.2mg

Ascorbic acid: 102mg

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