Foundation for Advancement in Cancer Therapy

Non-Traditional Approaches to
the Theories, Treatments and Prevention of Cancer

Broccoli

April 27, 2020

Broccoli was grown in France and Italy in the sixteenth century, but was not well known in this country until 1923, when the D’Arrigo Brothers Company made a trial planting of Italian sprouting broccoli in California. A few crates of this were sent to Boston, and by 1925 the market was well established. Since then, the demand for broccoli has been steadily on the increase.

Broccoli is a member of the cabbage family. California, Arizona, and Texas are the main broccoli-producing states.

When choosing broccoli, look for tenderness in the stalk, especially the upper portion. If the lower portion of the stalk is tough and woody, and if the bud dusters are open and yellow, the broccoli is over-mature and will be tough. Fresh broccoli does not keep, so purchase only as much as you can immediately use.

Broccoli is often gas-forming, but if cooked in a steamer or over a very low fire, this may be avoided. Broccoli is best if under-cooked, because the more green that is left in broccoli, the more chlorophyll will be left to counteract the sulfur compounds that form gas.

THERAPEUTIC VALUE

All of the foods in the cabbage family, including broccoli, are best if eaten with proteins, because the combination helps drive amino acids to the brain. Broccoli is high in vitamins A and C, and is low in calories. It is beneficial to the eliminative system.

NUTRIENTS IN ONE POUND

Calories: 103

Protein: 9.1 g

Fat: 0.6 g

Carbohydrates: 15.2 g

Calcium: 360 mg

Phosphorus: 211 mg

Iron: 5.6 mg

Vitamin A: 9,700 I.U.

Thiamine: 0.26 mg

Riboflavin: 0.59 mg

Niacin: 2.5 mg

Ascorbic acid: 327 mg

Beet

April 20, 2020

The beet has been cultivated for its roots and leaves since the third or fourth century B.C. It spread from the area of the Mediterranean to the Near East. In ancient times it was used only for medicinal purposes-the edible beet root we know today was unknown before the Christian era. In the fourth century beet recipes were recorded in England, and in 1810 the beet began to be cultivated for sugar in France and Germany. It is not known when the beet was first introduced to the United States, but it is known that there was one variety grown here in 1806. Sugar beets are usually yellowish-white, and are cultivated extensively in this country. The garden beet ranges from dark purplish-red to a bright vermillion to white, but the most popular commercial variety is red.

Beets are available in the markets all year. Their peak season is May through October. They are primarily grown in the southern United States, the Northeast, and the vest coast states. When selecting beets, do not just look at the condition of the leaves. Beets that remain to the ground too long become tough and woody, and can be identified by a short neck, deep scars, or several circles of leaf scars around the top of the beet.

THERAPEUTIC VALUE

Beets are wonderful for adding needed minerals. They can be used to eliminate pocket add material in the bowel and for ailments in the gall bladder and liver. Their vitamin A content is quite high, so they are not only good for the eliminative system, but also benefit the digestive and lymphatic systems.

NUTRIENTS IN ONE POUND (without tops)

Calories: 147

Protein: 5.4 g

Fat: 0.3 g

Carbohydrates: 32.6 g

Calcium: 51 mg

Phosphorus: 92 mg

Iron: 3.4 mg

Vitamin A: 22,700 I.U.

Thiamine: 0.07 m

Riboflavin: 0.16 mg

Niacin: 1.5 mg

Ascorbic acid: 80 mg

Banana

April 13, 2020

Bananas were cultivated in India 4,000 years ago. In 1482, the Portuguese found the banana on the Guinea coast and carried it with them to the Canary Islands. Spanish priests are credited with having introduced this fruit to tropical America when they arrived as missionaries in the sixteenth century. Now, the banana can be found in all tropical countries.

The first known species of banana is the plaintain or cooking banana. The plaintain has a salmon-colored a cheesy, gummy texture, and a slightly add taste. This fruit has been a substitute for bread or potatoes in many countries, and is slowly being introduced to the United States.

Bananas are usually harvested green, shipped green, and ripened by wholesale fruit jobbers in air-conditioned ripening rooms. The Gros Michel variety is the most popular of the many varieties. It produces the largest and most compact bunch, which makes it easier to ship. The thick skin of the banana protects the soft fruit.

Other popular varieties of banana are the Claret, or red banana, which has a gummy flesh; the Lady Finger, which is the smallest variety, but has a delicate, sweet flavor; and the Apple, which has an add flavor and tastes somewhat like a mellow apple.

In the tropics, bananas are often cooked and served with beans, rice, or tortillas. In the Latin American countries, the ripe banana is sometimes dried in the sun in much the same manner as figs and raisins. They arc often sliced when ripe and left in the sun until they are covered with a coating of white, sugary powder that arises from their own juices.

The banana has no particular growing season. A ripe banana is firm, with a plump texture, strong peel, and no trace of green on the skin. A skin that is flecked with brown means the fruit is good. Fully ripe bananas are composed of 76 percent water, 20 percent sugar, and 12 percent starch.

THERAPEUTIC VALUE

The sugars in the banana are readily available, and they contain many vitamins and minerals, and a great deal of fiber. They are excellent for young children and infants and are good in reducing diets because they satisfy the appetite and are low in fat.

Because they are so soft, they are good for persons who have intestinal disturbances, and for convalescents. Bananas feed the natural acidophilus bacteria of the bowel, and their high potassium content benefits the muscular system.

NUTRIENTS IN ONE POUND

Calories: 299

Protein: 3.6 g

Fat: 0.6 g

Carbohydrates: 69.9 g

Calcium: 24 mg

Phosphorus: 85 mg

Iron: 1.8 mg

Vitamin A: 1,300 I.U.

Thiamine: 0.27 mg

Riboflavin: 0.19 mg

Niacin: 1.7 mg

Ascorbic acid: 29 mg

Carrot

April 6, 2020

The carrot has been native to Europe since ancient times, and was introduced to the United States during the period of early colonization. Carrots soon became a staple garden crop. Today, they are one of the major truck and garden vegetables.

Depending on the variety, carrots grow to maturity and are ready for market within 70 to 120 days. They are always in season, and are produced in nearly all states. The largest carrot producers are Texas, Florida, and New York. Carrots are so easy to raise that a garden in your backyard in can yield carrots that are rich in vitamins and high in mineral content.

When purchasing carrots, look for firm, smooth, well-shaped carrots of good color and fresh appearance. The tops should be fresh and green, unless they have been damaged in transit from grower to market. Carrots with excessively thick masses of leaf stems at the point of attachment arc usually undesirable because they have large cores and may be woody. Look for carrots with “eye appeal.”

Carrots may be utilized in the diet in many ways. The best way is to eat them raw and as fresh as possible. Raw cam sticks and curls are attractive garnishes and appetizers. Grated carrot, steamed in a stainless steel kettle or baked in the oven and served with parsley and butter, is a nice dish. The bright color of carrots makes them appealing and appetizing to serve with dinner, in salads, with other vegetables, or with cottage cheese or apples and nuts.

Carrot tops are full of potassium, but because of this they are so bitter that the average person does not enjoy them. However, a small portion of the tops may be cut fine and put into mixed salads, or a bunch may be tied with string and cooked in broths or soups for flavoring and for their high mineral content. Lift them out before saving.

THERAPEUTIC VALUE

Because the carrot is so high in vitamin A, it has been used extensively in the diet to improve the eyesight. Carrots were used in World War II in aerial training schools to improve the eyesight of the students.

Many children have lower jaws that are underdeveloped. This deformity is usually the result of calcium deficiency in the child’s early growth. Babies do not always get enough calcium and some do not have enough raw food or other chewing foods that help promote normal growth of bones and teeth. It is good for a child to have a raw carrot with each meal. I have seen the teeth of children straighten out and the lower jaw develop in a year, when they were given a carrot to chew on before each meal

Carrots contain a great deal of roughage. They will help in an cases of constipation.

Used as a general bodybuilder, carrot juice is excellent. This juice is presently used in cases of severe illness, and as a foundation in cancer diets. It is delicious and nutritious when combined with other juices such as parsley, celery, watercress, endive, or romaine lettuce.

Everyone can benefit from drinking fresh vegetable juice, and carrot juice one of the best. Some juice vendors believe that die short, stubby carrot is the most flavorful and colorful, and contains more vitamins and minerals. However, the long, deader carrot can be high in these values, too, and is also used.

NUTRIENTS IN ONE POUND

Calories: 179

Protein: 4.8 g

Fat: 1.2 g

Carbohydrates: 37.2 g

Calcium: 156 mg

Phosphorus: 148 mg

Iron: 3.2 mg

Vitamin A: 48,000 I.U.

Thiamine: 0.27 mg

Riboflavin: 0.26 mg

Niacin: 2 mg

Ascorbic acid: 24 mg

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