Foundation for Advancement in Cancer Therapy

Non-Traditional Approaches to
the Theories, Treatments and Prevention of Cancer

Avocado

March 23, 2020

There are over 400 varieties of avocado. Some have smooth skin and are green, and some are rough and black. The avocado is considered a neutral fruit, because it blends well with almost any flavor and mixes well with either vegetables or fruit.

The avocado came from Persia. It has been popular in South America, Central America, and Mexico for centuries. The ancient Aztecs left evidence that the avocado was in their diet. as did the Mayans and Incas. It is known that the avocado was eaten by Jamaicans in the seventeenth century. This fruit grows wild in tropical America today, but is primarily grown as a crop in southern California.

THERAPEUTIC VALUE

Avocado at its peak contains a high amount of fruit oil. Fruit oil is a rare clement, and it gives avocado its smooth, mellow taste and nut-like flavor. Fruit oil also gives the avocado its high food energy value. Unlike most fruit, it contains very few carbohydrates.

The avocado contains fourteen minerals, all of which regulate body functions and stimulate growth. Especially noteworthy are its iron and copper contents, which aid in red blood regeneration and the prevention of nutritional anemia. It also contains sodium and potassium, which give this fruit a high alkaline reaction.

The avocado contains no starch, little sugar, and has some fiber or cellulose.

NUTRIENTS IN ONE POUND

Calories: 568

Protein: 7.1 g

Fat: 55.8 g

Carbohydrates: 21.4 g

Calcium: 34 mg

Phosphorus: 143 mg

Iron: 2.0 mg

Vitamin A: 990 I.U.

Thiamine: 0.37 mg

Riboflavin: 0.67 mg

Niacin: 5.4 mg

Ascorbic acid: 48 mg

Artichoke

March 16, 2020

The artichoke is believed to be native to the area around the western and central Mediterranean. The Romans were growing artichokes over 2000 years ago, and used it as a green and a salad plant.

Artichokes were brought to England in 1548, and French settlers planted them in Louisiana in the mid-nineteenth century. California is now the center of the artichoke crop, and its peak season is March, April, and May.

The name “artichoke” is derived from the northern Italian words :articiocco” and  “articoclos.” which refer to what we know to be a pine cone. The artichoke bud does resemble a pine cone.

There is a variety of vegetable called the Jerusalem artichoke, but it is not a true artichoke. It is a tuberous member of the sunflower family. Here, we refer to the two types of true artichokes, the Cardoon (cone-shaped) and the Globe. The most popular variety is the Green Globe.

The artichoke is a large, vigorous plant. It has long, coarse, spiny leaves that can grow to three feet long. The artichoke plants may grow as high as six feet tall.

A perennial, the artichoke grows best in cool, but not freezing, weather. It likes plenty of water, and rain and fog, so is best suited to the California coast, especially the San Francisco area.

For a good quality artichoke, select one that is compact, plump, and heavy, yields slightly to pressure, and has large, tightly clinging, fleshy leaf scales that are a good color. An artichoke that is brown is old or has been injured. An artichoke is over mature when it is open or spreading, the center is fuzzy or dark pink or purple, and the tips and scales are hard. March, April, and May are the months when the artichoke is abundant.

The parts of the artichoke that are eaten are the fleshy part of the leaves and heart, and the tender base. Medium-sized artichokes are best—large ones tend to be tough and tasteless. They may be served either hot or cold, and make a delicious salad.

To prepare artichokes, cut off the stem and any tough or damaged leaves. Wash the artichoke in cold running water, then place in boiling water, and cook twenty to thirty minutes, or until tender. To make the artichoke easier to eat, remove the choke in the center, pull out the top center leaves, and, with a spoon, remove the thistle-like inside.

To eat artichokes, pull off the petal leaves as you would the petals of a daisy, and bite off the end.

THERAPEUTIC VALUE

Artichoke hearts and leaves have a high alkaline ash. They also have a great deal of roughage, which is not good for those who have inflammation of the bowel. They are good to eat on a reducing diet.

Artichokes contain vitamins A and C, which are good for fighting off infection. They are high in calcium and iron.

NUTRIENTS IN ONE POUND (including inedible parts)

Calories: 60

Protein: 5.3 g

Fat: 0.4 g

Carbohydrates: 19.2 g

Calcium: 93 mg

Phosphorus: 160 mg

Iron: 2.4 mg

Vitamin A: 290 I.U.

Thiamine: 0.14 mg

Riboflavin: 0.09 mg

Niacin: 1.7 mg

Ascorbic acid: 22 mg

Artichoke

March 9, 2020

The artichoke is believed to be native to the area around the western and central Mediterranean. The Romans were growing artichokes over 2000 years ago, and used it as a green and a salad plant.

Artichokes were brought to England in 1548, and French settlers planted them in Louisiana in the mid-nineteenth century. California is now the center of the artichoke crop, and its peak season is March, April, and May.

The name “artichoke” is derived from the northern Italian words “articiocco” and “articoclos”, which refer to what we know to be a pine cone. The artichoke bud does resemble a pine cone.

There is a variety of vegetable called the Jerusalem artichoke, but it is not a true artichoke. It is a tuberous member of the sunflower family. Here, we refer to the two types of true artichokes, the Cardoon (cone-shaped) and the Globe. The most popular variety is the Green Globe.

The artichoke is a large, vigorous plant. It has long, coarse, spiny leaves that can grow to three feet long. The artichoke plants may grow as high as six feet tall.

A perennial, the artichoke grows best in cool, but not freezing, weather. It likes plenty of water, and rain and fog, so is best suited to the California coast, especially the San Francisco area.

For a good quality artichoke, select one that is compact, plump, and heavy, yields slightly to pressure, and has large, tightly clinging, fleshy leaf scales that are a good color. An artichoke that is brown is old or has been injured. An artichoke is over mature when it is open or spreading, the center is fuzzy or dark pink or purple, and the tips and scales are hard. March, April, and May are the months when the artichoke is abundant.

The parts of the artichoke that are eaten are the fleshy part of the leaves and heart, and the tender base. Medium-sized artichokes are best—large ones tend to be tough and tasteless. They may be served either hot or cold, and make a delicious salad.

To prepare artichokes, cut off the stem and any tough or damaged leaves. Wash the artichoke in cold running water, then place in boiling water, and cook twenty to thirty minutes, or until tender. To make the artichoke easier to eat, remove the choke in the center, pull out the top center leaves, and, with a spoon, remove the thistle-like inside.

To eat artichokes, pull off the petal leaves as you would the petals of a daisy, and bite off the end.

THERAPEUTIC VALUE

Artichoke hearts and leaves have a high alkaline ash. They also have a great deal of roughage, which is not good for those who have inflammation of the bowel. They are good to eat on a reducing diet.

Artichokes contain vitamins A and C, which are good for fighting off infection. They are high in calcium and iron

NUTRIENTS IN ONE POUND (including inedible parts)

Calories: 60

Protein: 5.3 g

Fat: 0.40 g

Carbohydrates: 19.2 g

Calcium: 93 mg

Phosphorus: 160 mg

Iron: 2.4 mg

Vitamin A: 290 I.U.

Thiamine: 0.14 mg

Riboflavin: 0.09 mg

Niacin: 1.7 mg

Ascorbic acid: 22 mg

Rethinking Cancer Newsletter #74

March 3, 2020

Filed under: Rethinking Cancer Newsletters — admin @ 9:49 am

“Our country faces a national nutrition crisis. Our food system is a major cause of poor health, ever-rising healthcare costs, strangled government budgets, diminished economic competitiveness of American business, reduced military readiness, and hunger and disparities. Americans of all backgrounds see these problems, and are hungry for and value leadership to create lasting solutions.”

So begins Tuft University’s Friedman School of Nutrition Science & Policy 2019 Public Impact Statement announcing a new bipartisan “Food Is Medicine” initiative. (“new”!? Of course, Hippocrates was onto this several millennia ago when he declared emphatically, “Food Is Your Best Medicine.”) A look at the initial “Key Facts” download lists the need to eat more nuts and seeds, fruits and vegetables, whole grains, with no mention of grass-fed meats, raw dairy, fermented foods, bone broths, high quality vegetable and animal fats, or even “organic,” anything, etc. But, hey, at least it’s an acknowledgment of a deathly problem for which pharmaceutical drugs are not the definitive answer.

Nevertheless, this is all the more reason to stay far ahead of establishment medical thinking and become your own best doctor, which is the goal of this website! Sadly, it often takes generations, even centuries, for Nature’s true wisdom to filter down to mainstream gospel, as noted in our article below, “Medicine and the Fine Art of Vilification.”

To your health!
Foundation for Advancement in Cancer Therapy (F.A.C.T.)

P.S. Welcome to 2020! This is F.A.C.T.’s 49th year which YOU have made possible with your enduring, generous support. We hope you’ll continue to take part via a donation or purchase of our film, Rethinking Cancer, or books (all US tax-deductible), so that we can keep on sharing the knowledge we’ve gained working with thousands of patients over the years. There is so much more! And, as always, we hope you’ll stay in the loop on Twitter, Facebook and our YouTube channel!

Medicine and the Fine Art of Vilification
by Consuelo Reyes, F.A.C.T. President

There are many ways to deal with new ideas. One would be to welcome them with open-minded inquiry. Another might be to stigmatize the purveyors of  “heretical” notions that dare to shake the status quo and perhaps threaten the egos (and fortunes) of the status quo keepers.

In other words, shoot the messenger. The history of medicine is rich with examples of great messengers who did get shot! And, unfortunately, the practice continues today. Here are just a few eamples. READ MORE

The Case for Vaccine Choice, Asking the Right Questions.
by Joseph Cooney, MD

I’ve had many conversations with parents regarding their concerns over the decision of whether or not to vaccinate their children. They are actually quite torn about it. On one hand, the medical world makes the argument that you are either crazy or selfish not to vaccinate. Vaccines help us avoid acute illness and, in doing so, lower death rates. It’s a no brainer, right? Not necessarily, because on the other hand, these parents hear about the association with declining acute illness in childhood and the growing chronic illness, allergy, and immune dysfunction in children and adults. They simply want what’s best for their child and they’re not sure what to do. How can we resolve this? Now with mandatory vaccination being advanced in some places, the issue is begging for review and reflection. READ MORE

Purple Power!

Nutritional gurus wisely tell us to eat a wide variety of colors when it comes to fruits and vegetables. This insures that we get the full range of phytonutrients the plant world has to offer. However, perhaps you’ve noticed, lately there’s a whole lot more purple in the produce section amidst the usual greens, yellows and whites. We’re taking about more purple-colored stuff than beets, eggplants, red cabbage and onions: purple-hued kale, cauliflower, carrots, asparagus, peppers, potatoes, even sweet corn, etc., etc.! And for good reason — turns out, deep red, blue and purple-colored foods contain perhaps the richest amount of a most powerful phytochemical, the antioxidant anthocyanin, which research is finding to be especially beneficial for cancer prevention, heart and gut health, dementia, osteoporosis, insulin resistance and more. READ MORE

Purple Carrot Ginger Soup

4 medium-large purple carrots, coarsely chopped
2 teaspoons unsalted butter
4 scallions, chopped
2 shallots, chopped
2-inch piece ginger, minced or grated
Unrefined Himalayan or Celtic sea salt and black pepper to taste
Dried coriander
Several cups (preferably distilled) water, vegetable, beef or chicken stock

  1. In a small covered pot, bring carrots and about a cup water to a boil over medium heat until cooked through, soft but not mushy, about 5 minutes.
  2. Meanwhile, in a pan over medium heat, melt butter. Add scallions, shallot, ginger, and salt and pepper to taste. Cook until shallots begin to soften and turn transparent.
  3. Transfer carrots, cooking water and sautéd veggies to a food processor or blender. Add coriander to taste and about 1 cup warm water to reach desired consistency. Process until smooth.
  4. Serve garnished with additional scallions and ginger.

(Bonus) Purple Ice Cream

3 ripe bananas, broken into 1-2 inch pieces, frozen
About 1 cup seedless purple grapes, washed and frozen

  1. Blend the frozen banana pieces in a food processor. You could do it in a blender, but let pieces thaw a bit before processing. Blend until you get a smooth, slightly stiff cream.
  2. Then add the frozen grapes and blend until it all becomes a frothy, creamy mass.
  3. Scrape it all out into a bowl with a pastry scraper. You can put the bowl into the freezer for about 30 minutes to get a firmer texture.
  4. Remove from freezer and indulge!
Created by the Foundation for the Advancement of Cancer Therapy
Copyright © 2017 – 2021. All rights reserved.

Rethinking Cancer Newsletter #73

Filed under: Rethinking Cancer Newsletters — admin @ 9:48 am

Most women dread mammograms, as well they should. Not only is the experience uncomfortable, time-consuming and anxiety-inducing, the diagnostic is increasingly acknowledged to be inaccurate, ineffective and, in many cases, harmful.

So here’s a hot new idea: mammogram boutiques! Many medical clinics across the country are creating spa-like spaces designed to entice reluctant women to submit to this questionable procedure. These facilities feature warmed-up robes, soft music, beverage bars, all in cheery, pastel colors, gently lit, with potted plants, inspiring quotes on the walls. One clinic serves pretzels, graham crackers and juice. Another highlights a chandelier and scent diffuser. Evidently, the V.I.P. treatment is working, as many clinics report more women now responding to their friendly notes saying, “It’s time for your yearly mammogram.”

This trend may be good for business, but is it good for women? The nonprofit Institute of Medicine, affiliate of U.S. National Academy of Sciences, has stated that the toxic effects of mammogram radiation are a significant factor in the development of breast cancer: just one mammogram can expose you to the radiation equivalent of 1,000 chest X-rays. Mammograms also carry an unacceptably high rate of false positives — up to 6 percent — which can lead to repeat screenings that expose you to even more radiation, as well as unnecessary invasive medical procedures, e.g., biopsies, surgery, chemotherapy. Moreover, the stress of a false positive can create havoc in daily life and body function. Too often, pre-cancerous masses, such as DCIS, which rarely lead to malignancy, are treated unnecessarily. Statistics show that mammograms do not save women’s lives or improve survival rates more than an annual physical examination alone.

In our view at F.A.C.T., a far better cancer screening option would be periodic thermography testing — a noninvasive diagnostic with no negative side effects. Thermography can detect problem areas years before cancers or other degenerative conditions fully develop. This kind of early stage detection can motivate an individual to get on a good Biorepair-type program, and, hopefully, avoid the trauma of a cancer diagnosis. Check the resource listed in our Practitioner Directory.

To your health!
Foundation for Advancement in Cancer Therapy (F.A.C.T.)

P.S. FALL SPECIAL!! For 2 weeks (ending Friday, October 4th), we are offering a 30% discount for all orders placed on our Donate page. Just apply the code SPECIAL30 at check-out and remember, all orders are U.S. tax-deductible. We hope you’ll take this chance to enhance your health library and your health! Thanks so much for your feedback and support and, as always, follow us on Twitter, Facebook and our YouTube channel!

The Truth About Drug Companies —
How They Deceive Us and What to Do About It

by Marcia Angell, M.D.
A Book Review by Consuelo Reyes, F.A.C.T. President

This review was written in 2004, when the book was first published. Unfortunately, not much has changed since then, though the subject matter is more relevant than ever and well worth revisiting. Author Marcia Angell is an American physician, a professor, and the first woman to serve as editor-in-chief of the New England Journal of Medicine. Now in her 80’s, she is a Senior Lecturer in the Department of Global Health and Social Medicine at Harvard Medical School in Boston, Massachusetts.

This book was not a “quick read” — not because it isn’t a very well-written, fascinating exposé
of one of the most powerful industries in our country (if not the world). Rather, it was slow going because every page contained so many outrages (e.g., examples of deception, manipulation, sheer unethical behavior at the public’s expense, etc.), I had to put it down frequently to cool off.
READ MORE

What Is A Friend?

In these fast-paced, too often polarized and stressed out times, perhaps the one thing we can all agree upon is that true friendships are really important. But it’s not so easy. It’s takes time to cultivate genuine friends, and to keep up with them through the thick and thin of decades. Most would concur, however, that it’s worth the time and energy.

So what is a real friend? Here are 7 qualities identified by a Facebook group. No doubt there are more you might come up with. READ MORE

Saving the Planet:
It’s Not the Cow; It’s the How!

There’s a myth afoot in the Environmental/Health Movement, that, if you’re really serious about saving the planet and being healthy, you have to stop eating meat! After all, don’t animals produce methane that increases global warming and doesn’t meat contain all kinds of hormones, antibiotics and other stuff bad for human well-being?

The reality is, there is nothing intrinsically bad about homo sapiens eating animal foods. In fact, animals have provided populations with vital sustenance for thousands of years. The problem is the way we manage animal production in this so-called advanced industrial age. When managed properly, livestock have the potential to strongly support human life and positively impact — even reverse — the effects of global warming! READ MORE


Goats in Gotham

Speaking of humans and animals partnering for a healthy environment, this summer Riverside Park Conservancy, in Upper West Side Manhattan,“hired” 24 goats in charge of weed control for steep areas overgrown with invasive and dangerous plants, like poison ivy and such. Goats are natural weed whackers, consuming vegetation like an all-you-can-eat buffet — as much as 25% of their body weight in one day! READ MORE

Grass-fed Spaghetti Sauce*

1 pound grass-fed ground beef
1 medium onion, peeled and finely chopped
1 1/2  cup beef or vegetable stock
1/2 cup red wine
1 tablespoon fresh rosemary leaves, chopped or 1/2 tablespoon dried rosemary
Sea salt and pepper to taste

  1. Sauté ground meat in a heavy skillet until crumbly.
  2. Add onions, stock, wine and rosemary. Bring to a simmer uncovered for 15-30 minutes until liquid has been reduced to a thick sauce.
  3. Season with salt and pepper.
  4. Serve over a grain like buckwheat, soba noodles or zucchini noodles.

*This is based on a recipe from the wonderful Nourishing Traditions by Sally Fallon.

Special thanks to artist and F.A.C.T. trustee, Ellen Rixford at EllenRixford.com

Created by the Foundation for the Advancement of Cancer Therapy
Copyright © 2017 – 2021. All rights reserved.

Rethinking Cancer Newsletter #72

Filed under: Rethinking Cancer Newsletters — admin @ 9:44 am

“Unless we put medical freedom into the Constitution, the time will come when medicine will organize into an undercover dictatorship to restrict the art of healing to one class of Men and deny equal privileges to others; the Constitution of the Republic should make a special privilege for medical freedoms as well as religious freedom.”
— Benjamin Rush (1746-1813)

Benjamin Rush — writer, educator, personal physician of George Washington — was a Founding Father of the United States and a signer of the Declaration of Independence. One can’t help wonder what he would be saying about the state of today’s medical dictates. We now have laws allowing separation of minor age children from their families, if parents do not submit their child for the legally-sanctioned toxic cancer treatments. We are experiencing a massive push to legislate mandatory vaccination, despite well-documented evidence of problems with the safety and efficacy of these pharmaceuticals. Fluoridation of our public water supplies — a form of mass medication — continues as more and more studies reveal health dangers related to toxicity.

There is a frenzy afoot, based on fear instead of facts, profits over accountability, threatening the individual’s right to choose how to protect his/her health and that of their families.

First and foremost, be informed about your choices. Investigate; question. If Dr. Rush were around today, more than likely he’d be out there urging you to let your legislators know how you feel about your right to medical freedom!

To your health!
Foundation for Advancement in Cancer Therapy (F.A.C.T.)

P.S. F.A.C.T. has existed for nearly 5 decades because so many people care to take the time to be informed about all their viable medical options in order to make wise, independent decisions. We hope you’ll continue to support our efforts and make use of our resources — our film, Rethinking Cancer,  now streaming on Itunes, and our many publications and articles. And do stay in touch on Twitter, Facebook, and our YouTube channel.

The Choice Is Yours by Ruth Sackman

This article, first published in our official F.A.C.T. magazine, Cancer Forum, is now included in our latest book,  Healing Cancer — The Unconventional Wisdom of Ruth Sackman.

How do you decide what to do when your doctor says, “It’s cancer”? You’ve heard about alternatives, but there are so many and the claims of efficacy sound so dramatic. Can it all be true? You know that the conventional cancer treatment of surgery, radiation and/or chemotherapy has an overall claimed cure rate of 50%. You find yourself in a panic about making a decision. Let me try to clarify the information for the lay person and dispel the myths perpetuated by both the conventional adherents and alternative supporters. READ MORE

Eye Aerobics

We live in a sea of screens. Indeed, many people spend 8 or more hours every day staring at various versions of them. Moreover, our eyes are constantly being stimulated by artificial lights — blinking traffic lights, neon lights, compact fluorescent lights (CFLs), even energy-saving LEDs (which emit blue light that can generate high amounts of oxidative stress). Over time, this can spell trouble for the eyes, resulting in a condition now called Computer Vision Syndrome (CVS), characterized by: squinting, blurred vision, dry, red eyes, itchy eyes, watery eyes, double vision, headaches, neck or back pain. READ MORE

Burdock — Know Your Roots

You’ve probably seen burdock in the produce section of your health food store — gnarled, rather grungy-looking roots that don’t look particularly exciting to the taste buds (though the taste is actually quite pleasant). But beauty is way more than skin deep and this one’s got a whole lot to offer, e.g., as a blood purifier, lymphatic strengthener, natural diuretic, skin healer, a defense against diabetes, cancer, arthritis, etc., not to mention being the inspiration for Velcro AND a possible aphrodesiac! READ MORE

Burdock Tea

This medicinal herbal tea helps cleanse the body of toxins, restore and stimulate the liver and gall bladder, and, in general, help to rebalance and revitalize the whole body. Because of its strong diuretic and detoxifying actions, it should be taken no more than 2-3 times a day and for short intervals of time. For some people, prolonged use of burdock may cause urinary tract irritation. Check other precautions in the burdock article above,

  1. Bring 2 cups of pure water to a boil.
  2. If using fresh burdock, take a firm root, wash and scrape clean. Use about 1 tablespoon chopped or sliced for 2 cups of water. For dried, use 1-2 teaspoons.
  3. Place the herb in a pan or bowl and pour the boiling water over it. Let it sit for about 5-10 minutes.
  4. Strain and drink no more than 2-3 cups a day for short periods of time. This is a strong tea with a soothing, pleasant flavor. If you like, you can add a bit of raw honey or lemon juice.

Created by the Foundation for the Advancement of Cancer Therapy
Copyright © 2017 – 2021. All rights reserved.

Mango

March 2, 2020

The mango is said to have originated in Burma, Malaya, or the Himalayan region of India. It has been in cultivation for over 4000 years and has entered prominently in Hindu mythology and religious observances. It is now a familiar fruit to all parts of the tropic zone, and is as important there as the apple is in our more temperate climate.

Although the mango is not too well-known in this country, some parts of the world value this fruit highly. Glowing descriptions of mangos can be found in the literature of these countries. The Turkoman poet, Amir Khusrau, for instance, wrote of the mango in the fourteenth century: “The mango is the pride of the garden, the choicest fruit of Hindustan. Other fruits we are content to eat when ripe, but the mango is good in all stages of growth”.

The first attempt to introduce the mango into this country was made in 1833, when plants were transported to Florida from Mexico. These trees died, and another attempt was made thirty years later when seedling trees were introduced. The real success of its culture came at the beginning of this century, when choice grafted trees were brought from India. Because the fruit’s susceptibility to frost, its culture is limited to certain sections of Florida, where it is a summer crop only.

The mango tree is a member of the sumac family. Its sometimes grows as high as 40 feet. Its leaves are shiny and its flowers yellow or of a reddish hue. There are hundreds of varieties of mangos, and they range from the size of plums to that of apples, often weighing a pound or more. The common color of the mango is orange, although the fruit may range from green to yellow or red.

This fruit is available from May to September, the peak month being June. Some varieties are shipped in from China, Jamaica, Mexico and Cuba. A quality mango has a fairly small seed stone, and the pulp is delicate and smooth. The fruit should be fresh in appearance, plump, and firm to the touch; however the test of quality is in its taste.

Mangos are best eaten as a fresh fruit. They have a high sugar content, although they are slightly acid in taste. Mangos are good used in combination with other fruits in salads, and in some parts of the world they are roasted. Both the flavor and aroma of mangos are spicy and attractive. To conserve the aroma, do not cut until just before serving.

THERAPEUTIC VALUE

Mangos contain a considerable amount of gallic acid, which may be binding to the bowels. It is excellent as a disinfectant to the body. Many people claim the mango is a great blood cleanser,and it also has fever-soothing qualities. mango juice will reduce excessive body heat. Mangos are also wonderful for helping to throw off body odors.

NUTRIENTS IN ONE POUND

Calories 198

Protein 2.1g

Fat 0.6g

Carbohydrates 51.6g

Calcium 27mg

Phosphorus 39mg

Iron 0.6g

Vitamin A 14,5901I.U.

Thiamine 0.19mg

Riboflavin 0.17mg

Niacin 2.8 mg

Ascorbic acid 106mg

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