Foundation for Advancement in Cancer Therapy

Non-Traditional Approaches to
the Theories, Treatments and Prevention of Cancer

Pumpkin

October 28, 2019

The pumpkin, along with other squashes, is native to Americas. The stems, seeds, and parts of the fruit of the pumpkin have been found in the ruins of the ancient cliff dwellings in the southwestern part of the United States. Other discoveries in these ruins indicate that the pumpkin may even have been grown by the “basket makers”, whose civilization precedes that of the cliff dwellers, and who were probably the first agriculturists in North America.

Present varieties of pumpkin have been traced back to the days of Indian tribes. One variety, The Cushaw, was being grown by the Indians in 1586.

Botanically, a pumpkin is a squash. The popular term pumpkin has become a symbol, or tradition, at Halloween and Thanksgiving. The tradition dates as far back as the first colonial settlers.

Pumpkin can be served as a boiled or baked vegetable and as a filling for pies or in custards. It also makes a good ingredient for cornbread.

Pumpkins are grown throughout the United States and are used in or near the producing area. They are classed as stock feed and pie types, some serving both purposes. The principal producers are Indiana, Illinois, New Jersey, Maryland, Iowa, and California. They may be found in stores from late August to March, the peak months being October through December.

Pumpkins of quality should be heavy for their size and free of blemishes, with a hard rind. Watch for decay if the flesh has been bruised or otherwise injured. Decay may appear as a water-soaked area, sometimes covered with a dark, mold-like growth.

THERAPEUTIC VALUE

Pumpkins are very high in potassium and sodium and have a moderately low carbohydrate content. They are alkaline in reaction and are affair source of vitamins Band C. Pumpkins are good in soft diets.

Pumpkin can be used in pudding or it can be liquefied. One of the best ways to serve pumpkin is to bake it. Pumpkin seeds and onions mixed together with a little soy milk make a great remedy for parasitic worms in the digestive tract. To make this remedy, liquefy three tablespoons of pumpkin seeds that have been soaked for three hours, one-half of a small onion, one half cupsoy milk, and one teaspoon of honey. Take this amount three times daily, three days in a row.

NUTRIENTS IN ONE POUND (without rind and seeds)

Calories: 83

Protein: 3.8 g

Fat: 0.3 g

Carbohydrates: 20.6 g

Calcium: 66 mg

Phosphorus: 138 mg

Iron: 2.5 mg

Vitamin A: 5,080 I.U.

Thiamine: .15 mg

Riboflavin: .35 mg

Niacin: 1.8 mg

Ascorbic acid: 30 mg

Persimmon

October 21, 2019

For centuries Japan and China have been growing the Oriental or Japanese persimmon. It is probably native to China, since it was introduced to Japan from that country. The Japanese consider it their national fruit but it is more properly called Oriental rather than Japanese persimmon, since it is not native to Japan. Commodore Perry’s expedition, which opened Japan to world commerce in 1852, is credited with the introduction of this fruit to the United States.

The persimmon that is native to the United States grows wild in the East from Connecticut to Florida, and in the West from Texas to Kansas. This persimmon is much smaller than the Oriental, but has richer flesh. The wild fruit grows in sufficient abundance to satisfy local demand, and little or no shipping is done.

In general, persimmons that have dark-colored flesh are always sweet and nonastringent and may be eaten before they become too soft. Varieties with light-colored flesh, with the exception of the Fuyu variety, are astringent until they soften. The astringency is due to the presence of a large amount of tannin, the same substance found in tea. As the fruit ripens and sweetens the tannin disappears. Ripening can take place just as well off the tree as on.

The Japanese remove the “pucker” from persimmons by placing them in casks that have been used for sake, or Japanese liquor. Allowing persimmons to sweeten naturally will remove the “pucker,” or tannin.

The season for persimmons is October through December, and the peak month is November. Almost all commercial shipments originate in California. The Hachiya is the largest and handsomest oriental variety grown in this country. As a rule, California produces a seedless variety, but the Hachiya grown in Florida has one or more seeds. The Hachiya fruit is cone-shaped and terminates in a black point. The skin is a glossy, deep, orange-red and the flesh is deep yellow, astringent until soft, but sweet and rich when ripe. The Tanenashi is the more important variety in the southeastern states. There are many other varieties that are grown commercially.

Good quality fruit is well-shaped, plump, smooth, and highly colored. The skin is unbroken and the stem cap is attached. Ripeness is usually indicated by softness.

THERAPEUTIC VALUE

When thoroughly ripe, persimmons are a rich source of fruit sugar. Dried persimmons are almost as sweet as candy. They are rich in potassium, magnesium, and phosphorus, and are good to use in a soft diet.

NUTRIENTS IN ONE POUND

Calories: 286

Protein: 2.6 g

Fat: 1.8 g

Carbohydrates: 73 g

Calcium: 26 mg

Phosphorus: 97 mg

Iron: 1.3 mg

Vitamin A: 10,080 I.U.

Thiamine: .11 mg

Riboflavin: .08 mg

Niacin: .4 mg

Ascorbic acid: 48 mg

Onion

October 14, 2019

Onions are believed to have originated in Asia. When the Israeli’s were in the wilderness after being led out of Egypt by Moses, they yearned for onions and other vegetables they were used to eating. Onions were used by the Egyptians as offerings to their gods. They were fed to the workmen who built the pyramids, and Alexander the Great gave onions to his troops to promote their valor.

The odoriferous onion and the dainty lily are members of the same family, Liliaceae. The substance that gives the onion its distinctive odor and flavor is a volatile sulfurous oil which is about half eliminated by boiling. This volatile oil is what causes tears. Holding onions under cold water while peeling them prevents the oil fumes from rising, so use water and spare your handkerchief.

Onions lose approximately 27% of their original ascorbic acid (vitamin C) after five minutes of boiling.

There are two classes of onions—strong and mild. The early grown onions are generally milder in flavor and odor and are preferred for raw use. Each of these two classes can be again categorized into four colors—red, brown, white and yellow. The white onions are the mildest. Each has many varieties.

Onions are also further divided by size for different uses. The smallest size is the pickling onion, also knows as pearl or button onion, and is not more than one inch thick. The next size is the boiling onion, which is usually an inch to two inches in diameter. The next larger size is preferred for chopping or grating. The very large Spanish or Bermuda onions are mild and sweet and good for slicing. They average two and one-half to two and three-quarters inches in diameter. In the trade, the term Valencia is used to mean Spanish-type yellow onions. The globe and flat-type yellow onions are generally referred to as yellows, and white onions of the globe and semi-globe types are generally referred to as whites.

Texas is the main early spring producer; California and Texas the main late spring states; California and New Jersey the most important early summer producers; and New York, Michigan, Minnesota, Colorado, California, Idaho, and Oregon the principal late summer states.

THERAPEUTIC VALUE

Onions are one of the earliest known food medicines, and were used for hundreds of years for colds and catarrhal disorders and to drive fermentations and impurities out of the system. The liquid from a raw onion that has been chopped up fine, covered with honey, and left standing for four or five hours, makes an excellent cough syrup. It is wonderful for soothing an inflamed throat. Onion packs on the chest have been used for years in bronchial inflammations.

Onions contain a large amount of sulfur and are especially good for the liver. As a sulfur food, they mix best with proteins, as they stimulate the action of the amino acids to the brain and nervous system. Whenever onions are eaten, it is a good idea to use greens with them. Parsley especially helps neutralize the effects of the onion sulfur in the intestinal tract.

NUTRIENTS IN ONE POUND

Calories: 157

Protein: 6 g

Fat: 0.4 g

Carbohydrates: 36 g

Calcium: 111 mg

Phosphorus: 149 mg

Iron: 2.1 mg

Vitamin A: 160 I.U.

Thiamine: 0.15 mg

Riboflavin: 0.10 mg

Niacin: 0.6 mg

Ascorbic acid: 38 mg

Broccoli

October 7, 2019

Broccoli was grown in France and Italy in the sixteenth century, but was not well known in this country until 1923, when the D’Arrigo Brothers Company made a trial planting of Italian sprouting broccoli in California. A few crates of this were sent to Boston, and by 1925 the market was well established. Since then, the demand for broccoli has been steadily on the increase.

Broccoli is a member of the cabbage family. California, Arizona, and Texas are the main broccoli-producing states.

When choosing broccoli, look for tenderness in the stalk, especially the upper portion. If the lower portion of the stalk is tough and woody, and if the bud dusters are open and yellow, the b m – wli is over-mature and will be tough. Fresh broccoli does not keep, so purchase only as much as you can immediately use.

Broccoli is often gas-forming, but if cooked in a steamer or over a very low fire, this may be avoided. Broccoli is best if under-cooked, because the more green that is left in broccoli, the more chlorophyll will be left to counteract the sulfur compounds that form gas.

THERAPEUTIC VALUE

All of the foods in the cabbage family, including broccoli, are best if eaten with proteins, because the combination helps drive amino acids to the brain. Broccoli is high in vitamins A and C, and is low in calories. It is beneficial to the eliminative system.

NUTRIENTS IN ONE POUND

Calories: 103

Protein: 9.1 g

Fat: 0.6 g

Carbohydrates: 15.2 g

Calcium: 360 mg

Phosphorus: 211 mg

Iron: 5.6 mg

Vitamin A: 9,700 I.U.

Thiamine: 0.26 mg

Riboflavin: 0.59 mg

Niacin: 2.5 mg

Ascorbic acid: 327 mg

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