Foundation for Advancement in Cancer Therapy

Non-Traditional Approaches to
the Theories, Treatments and Prevention of Cancer

Melon

August 26, 2019

The many varieties of the popular melon give us certain elements not found in any other food. The honeydew melon originated in Asia, and it is believed that, as early as 2,400 B.C., this distinct type of muskmelon was growing in Egypt. The cantaloupe is native to India and Guinea and has been cultivated for more for more than 2,000 years. In Europe, it was first grown from seed transported from its native habitat.

The highly alkalizing honeydew was introduced to America in 1900 and Arizona and California have become the biggest producers. It is available the year around, but it is at its peak of abundance in July through September. The cantaloupe is available from late May through September, but is most abundant in June and July.

Both the honeydew and the casaba, which is another variety of winter melon, are usually picked before maturity and ripened off the vine. Cantaloupe, however, do not develop any additional sugar after they are picked. This melon should be picked when it is still hard and pulls off the vine smoothly, without leaving a jagged scar.

Learn to select melons by the color and firmness of their rind, and by fragrance. The cantaloupe may have a coarse netting over its surface (with a yellow, not green color beneath when ripe), or it may be of fine texture, depending again upon variety. Choose cantaloupe for their sweet fragrance. The casaba rind is golden in color and should feel heavy when ripe. A ripe honeydew has a creamy yellow surface color, and usually the scar in the blossom end yields to slight pressure.

The coloring of the flesh also is important, both as to degree of ripeness and to pleasing the eye and thus the palate. When fully ripe, casaba melons are cream in color, honeydews a yellowish cream in color, and cantaloupes either a light or dark shade of salmon, depending upon variety. Deeply colored flesh in the melon denotes that it will be high in vitamin A.

It is important to pick a thoroughly ripe watermelon in order to receive the greatest benefit. A ripe watermelon, when thumped with the fingers, has a dull, hollow sound. Another test of a good ripe melon is to try to scrape the rind with the fingernail; when the green skin comes off easily, the melon is ready to be eaten. Good watermelon has firm, crisp, juicy flesh and is never dry or fibrous.

Melons are very high in silicon, especially if eaten right down to the rind. When we discard watermelon rind, we are missing one its greatest elements. To obtain the gland- and blood-building chlorophyll, run the rind through a liquifier or juicer.

Watermelon, of course, is well-known as an efficient eliminator. Because it has such a high content of water and soluble chemicals, it can go into the bloodstream quickly and reach many of the organs of the body, depositing the chemicals needed to carry away waste.

During melon season, we should strengthen the body for the winter months with a “melon reserve” of vitamins A, B, and C, which are found in delightful form in the melon family.

THERAPEUTIC VALUE

Melon gives us an excellent supply of distilled water, along with the finest mineral elements possible. Many of us think we are drinking enough water, but our city water supplies do not give us “pure” water. Melons with their root system, pick up water from deep, in-ground reserves, and bring it to our tables in a delicious fruit substance. Consider the melon for rejuvenation and alkalinizing the body. Melons also are excellent for aiding elimination.

NUTRIENTS IN ONE POUND

Calories: 65

Protein: 1.0 g

Fat: 0.4 g

Carbohydrates: 14.4 g

Calcium: 15 mg

Phosphorus: 25 mg

Iron: 0.4 mg

Vitamin A: 1,240 I.U.

Thiamine: .10 mg

Riboflavin: .11 mg

Niacin: 0.4 mg

Ascorbic acid: 13 mg

Lima Beans

August 19, 2019

Records found in old Peruvian tombs show that lima beans have been around for centuries. European explorers found this vegetable in Lima, Peru, and this is where the name comes from. Lima beans probably originated in Guatemala, and are still grown in tropical regions.

The flourishing dry lima bean industry of southern California seems to have started in 1865. In this year, Henry Lewis bought a few hundred pounds of lima bean seeds from a tramp steamer from Peru that had put in port at Santa Barbara. Most of the dry lima bean crop is produced along the Pacific coast from Santa Ana to Santa Barbara, and Florida is also a large producer of lima beans. The peak months of supply are July through October.

There are two types of lima beans. The large “potato” type have large pods and are fleshy and not likely to split at maturity. The baby lima bean is an annual plant that matures early. The pods are small and numerous, and are likely to split open at maturity.

When selecting lima beans, look for quality pods that are fresh, bright green in color, and well-filled. Lima beans, when shelled, should be plump with tender skins, green to greenish white. The skin should puncture when it is tested. Hard, tough skins mean that the bean is over mature, and these beans usually lack flavor. Lima beans are often called “butter” beans.

THERAPEUTIC VALUE

Lima beans can be used either dry or fresh. Fresh lima beans are alkaline and have high protein value. Dry limas are hard to digest, and the dry skin is irritating to an inflamed digestive system. Lima beans are beneficial to the muscular system.

Lima beans are excellent as a puree in soft diets for stomach disorders. They make a tasty baked dish, such as bean loaf. One pound of lima beans contains as many nutrients as two pounds of meat!

Dry beans have high protein content of almost 18%, but fresh beans are only 4% protein. The kidney bean and navy bean are very similar in makeup and therapeutic value to the lima bean.

NUTRIENTS IN ONE POUND (unshelled)

Calories: 234

Protein: 13.6 g

Fat: 1.5 g

Carbohydrates: 42.8 g

Calcium: 115 mg

Phosphorus: 288 mg

Iron: 4.2 mg

Vitamin A: 520 I.U.

Thiamine: .38 mg

Riboflavin: .21 mg

Niacin: 2.5 mg

Ascorbic acid: 48 mg

Beets

August 12, 2019

The beet has been cultivated for its roots and leaves since the third or fourth century B.C. It spread from the area of the Mediterranean to the Near East. In ancient times it was used only for medicinal purposes-the edible beet root we know today was unknown before the Christian era. In the fourth century beet recipes were recorded in England, and in 1810 the beet began to be cultivated for sugar in France and Germany. It is not known when the beet was first introduced to the United States, but it is known that there was one variety grown here in 1806. Sugar beets are usually yellowish-white, and are cultivated extensively in this country. The garden beet ranges from dark purplish-red to a bright vermillion to white, but the most popular commercial variety is red.

Beets are available in the markets all year. Their peak season is May through October. They are primarily grown in the southern United States, the Northeast, and the vest coast states. When selecting beets, do not just look at the condition of the leaves. Beets that remain to the ground too long become tough and woody, and can be identified by a short neck, deep scars, or several circles of leaf scars around the top of the beet.

THERAPEUTIC VALUE

Beets are wonderful for adding needed minerals. They can be used to eliminate pocket add material in the bowel and for ailments in the gall bladder and liver. Their vitamin A content is quite high, so they are not only good for the eliminative system, but also benefit the digestive and lymphatic systems.

NUTRIENTS IN ONE POUND (without tops)

Calories: 147

Protein: 5.4 g

Fat: 0.3 g

Carbohydrates: 32.6 g

Calcium: 51 mg

Phosphorus: 92 mg

Iron: 3.4 mg

Vitamin A: 22,700 I.U.

Thiamine: 0.07 mg

Riboflavin: 0.16 mg

Niacin: 1.5 mg

Ascorbic acid: 80 mg

Radish

August 5, 2019

The radish is a member of the mustard family, but is also related to cabbage, cauliflower, kale, and turnips. After this vegetable was introduced into Middle Asia from China in prehistoric times, many forms of the plant were developed. Radishes are a cool season crop, and the peak period is April through July. The American varieties can be used for both roots and tops in salads, and cooked.

A good-quality radish is well-formed, smooth, firm, tender, and crisp, with a mild flavor. The condition of the leaves does not always indicate quality, for they may be fresh, bright, and green, while the radishes may be spongy and strong, or the leaves may be wilted and damaged in handling, while the radishes themselves may be fresh and not at all pithy. Old, slow-growing radishes are usually strong in flavor, with a woody flesh. Slight finger pressure will disclose sponginess or pithiness.

THERAPEUTIC VALUE

Radishes are strongly diuretic and stimulate the appetite and digestion. The juice of raw radishes is helpful in catarrhal conditions. The mustard oil content of the radish makes it good for expelling gallstones from the bladder.

A good cocktail can be made with radishes. This cocktail will eliminate catarrhal congestion in the body, especially in the sinuses. It will also aid in cleansing the gall bladder and liver. To make this cocktail, combine one-third cucumber juice, one-third radish juice, and one-third green pepper juice. If desired, apple juice may be added to make this more palatable. An excellent cocktail for nervous disorders is made from radish juice, prune juice, and rice polishings. This drink is high in vitamin B and aids in the flow of bile.

NUTRIENTS IN ONE POUND

Calories: 49

Protein: 2.9g

Fat: .3g

Carbohydrates: 10.3g

Calcium: 86mg

Phosphorus: 89mg

Iron: 2.9mg

Vitamin A: 30 I.U.

Thiamine: .09mg

Riboflavin: .09mg

Niacin: .9mg

Ascorbic Acid: 74mg

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