Foundation for Advancement in Cancer Therapy

Non-Traditional Approaches to
the Theories, Treatments and Prevention of Cancer

Lettuce

June 24, 2019

Lettuce is one of the oldest vegetables and probably originated in India or Central Asia. According to the writings or Herodotus, lettuce was served to the Persian kings as far back as the sixth century BC. It was a popular Roman food at about the beginning of the Christian era, and in the first century AD a dozen distinctively different varieties were described by Roman writers of the era. There is also evidence that lettuce was grown in China in the fifth century AD.

Columbus may have carried lettuce seeds to the New World, for it was being cultivated in the Bahamas in 1494. It was a common vegetable in Haiti as early as 1565, and Brazil was reported to have cultivated before 1650. The early colonists evidently introduced lettuce into the US, and in 1806 16 varieties were reported growing in American gardens.

Both the English and Latin words for lettuce are based on the heavy, milky juice of the vegetable, which is characteristic of the lettuce family. The primitive forms of lettuce has long stems and large leafs grew at the end of these stems. These closed –packed lettuce heads were well developed in Europe by the 16th century, while the loose common head type of developed later.

Lettuce has become the most valuable truck crop, and 85% of the commercial crop is produced in the west-California, Arizona, Colorado, Washington, Oregon, and Idaho. The northeast and south Atlantic states are also important lettuce growing regions.

Lettuce is available all year, and the peak months are May, June, and July. Although the crisp head and butter head types are the most important from a commercial standpoint, the Cos or Romaine type are bets from a health standpoint, as the sun is allowed to penetrate each leaf. The leaves generally have less of the bitterness that is characteristic of some types of head lettuce. The “leaf” or the “bunching” type of lettuce is distinguished by loose leaves that do not form a head. This type is best for home gardening, as it can be grown in areas where the temperature is too high for successful growing of the other types of lettuce. The stem type lettuce has an enlarged stem and no head. The leaves are not as palpable as the other types of lettuce leaves except when young and tender. The stems are pulled and eaten raw or cooked.

Lettuce of good quality should be fresh, crisp, and tender, and if in head lettuce form, the head should be fairly firm to hard. Lettuce with a well developed seed stem has a bitter flavor.

THERAPEUTIC VALUE

Leaf lettuce is much richer in iron than head lettuce. We do not advocate using head lettuce in the diet, for it contains little nourishment. It contains significantly lower amounts of vitamins A and C than green Romaine lettuce. The darker green outside leaves contain a much higher proportion of the valuable food elements than the light colored inner leaves. Head lettuce is very gas forming , and really only offers bulk to the intestinal tract. It has an alkaline ash, however, and is not stimulating. Also, it is excellent for those who would like to lose weight. It also has many sleep promoting elements and makes good lettuce juice, which help promote sleep. It tends to slow down the digestive effect of the intestinal tract.

NUTRIENTS IN ONE POUND (head lettuce)

Calories: 57

Protein: 3.8 g

Fat: 0.6 g

Carbohydrates: 0.1 g

Calcium: 86 mg

Phosphorus: 78 mg

Iron: 1.6 mg

Vitamin A: 1,710 I.U.

Thiamine: 0.20 mg

Riboflavin: 0.21 mg

Niacin: 0.5 mg

Ascorbic acid: 24 mg

Cherry

June 17, 2019

Garden cherries originated chiefly from two species, the sour cherry and the sweet cherry. Both are native to Eastern Europe and Western Asia, where they have been cultivated since ancient times. Cherry pits have been found in prehistoric cave dwellings.

Cherries are grown in every state. Leading cherry producers are New York, Pennsylvania, Ohio, Michigan, Wisconsin, Montana, Idaho, Colorado, Utah, Washington, Oregon, and California. Washington, Oregon, and California leading sweet cherry production, while Michigan leads in production of sour cherries.

The Tartarian variety, which is mahogany to black in color, and medium to large in size, is a popular early to mid-season variety of sweet cherry. The cherry in heaviest demand for the fresh market is the Bing: an extra large, heart-shaped, deep maroon to black fruit. It is firm, high-flavored, and stands up well. Bing cherries are on the market through the months of June and July. The Black Republican and Lambert are similar in appearance to the Bing. The Royal Ann is the leading light-colored cherry, and is used primarily for canning. It is large, is light amber to yellow with red blush, and has a delightful flavor. The Schmidt is a dark red to black sweet cherry grown widely. The Windsor is another popular sweet cherry, and its color is dark red to almost black.

The leading sour varieties of the cherry are the Early Richmond of the East and Middle West, The Montmorenci and the English Morello.

THERAPEUTIC VALUE

The cherry is high in Iron, and is an excellent laxative as well as a wonderful blood builder. The black cherry is best for eating.

Cherries mix well with other fruits and with proteins, but never with starches. They are wonderful in an elimination diet. The cherry should not often be mixed with dairy foods. This fruit, which has high alkaline content, also gets rid of toxic waste, and it has a wonderful effect on the glandular system.

Black cherry juice is wonderful for flavoring teas so that sugar can be avoided. It is a wonderful gall bladder and liver cleanse because of its high iron content. Take a six-ounce glass of black cherry juice each morning before breakfast for the gall bladder and liver.

NUTRIENTS IN ONE POUND

Calories: 286

Protein: 5.3 g

Fat: 1.2 g

Carbohydrates: 71 g

Calcium: 90 mg

Phosphorus: 78 mg

Iron: 1.6 mg

Vitamin A: 450 I.U.

Thiamine: .20 mg

Riboflavin: .24 mg

Niacin: 1.7 mg

Ascorbic acid: 41 mg

Rethinking Cancer Newsletter #71

June 10, 2019

Filed under: Rethinking Cancer Newsletters — admin @ 12:40 pm

Several newsletters ago, we printed an article about the new 5G cellular technology — the incredible hype around it AND the shocking lack of interest by industry and government in the potential dangers it poses to human health and the environment.

Now, at least, someone in government is asking the right questions. In February, at a Senate Commerce Committee meeting, “Winning the Race to 5G and the Next Era Technology Innovation in the United States,” Senator Richard Blumenthal (CT) stated, “I believe that Americans deserve to know what the health effects are….How much money has the industry committed to support independent research?…on the biological effects of this new technology?”

The industry rep replied:“There are no industry backed studies to my knowledge right now.” To which Sen. Blumenthal responded, “so, we are flying blind here on health and safety…We need to know whether the technology can cause cancer and other diseases.”

According to a worldwide consortium of over 200 doctors and scientists, among the many ill-effects likely to occur after the introduction of 5G are increases in blindness, hearing loss, male infertility, skin cancers, thyroid issues, nervous system dysfunction, etc. If you are concerned about the mad rush to 5G — whatever country you may be in — let your elected officials know that the “precautionary principle” must apply. Before 5G can be imposed on us, more independent research is urgently needed to assess the health and safety impacts of this new technology on all living things.

To your health!
Foundation for Advancement in Cancer Therapy (F.A.C.T.)

P.S. We greatly appreciate your continued support! View our film, Rethinking Cancer, streaming on iTunes — now with thousands of views worldwide. Check out our books, including the latest, Healing Cancer, loaded with unique and practical information. And, as always, stay connected on Twitter, Facebook and our YouTube channel!

New Cure for the Common Cold — Understand It!

“I’ve never had a cold in my life,” boasted a 75-year-old man.  (Five months after making this statement he was dead with cancer.)  He had adopted a superior attitude toward his wife, who was constantly bothered with colds.  Every winter, and all winter long, she suffered with coughing and sneezing, with dripping nose and stopped up air passages.  She was constantly dosing with cough syrups, “Vicks” salves, steam vapors, and all the patent nostrums in vogue.

To all outward appearances the wife was the sickliest of the two because she manifested illness.  And this is the conclusion that most people would come to — people who consider disease as a life-threatening outside invader to be vanquished or “cured.”  Medical doctors would say that she is lucky — she survived in spite of her constant illness.  But the fact that she outlived her husband by many years and is now hale and strong tells us something.  The colds were good for her! READ MORE

Noise, Silence and Your Brain

We live in a noisy world that exacts a toll on us, especially on our brains. Studies confirm that, even when sleeping, sound waves activate the amygdala, that part of the brain associated with memory and emotion, leading to the release of stress hormones that can make normal functioning very difficult. Research also shows that, when we experience silence, our brains are able to rebalance our internal and external environments, enabling a return to normal function and overall wellbeing. In other words, silence heals. READ MORE

Lavender — Tranquility and Beyond

Folk healers have used lavender since ancient times to treat ailments like anxiety, insomnia, depression, headaches, hair loss, nausea, acne, toothaches, skin irritations and cancer. Modern scientists have confirmed these benefits, and are in the process of discovering a whole lot more.
READ MORE

Herb/Fruit Infused Water

Our bodies are about 60% water, so it’s important to hydrate throughout the day. However, if your taste buds occasionally need a bit more dazzle than pure, plain water can provide, try infused water. It’s also a pleasant way for soda-aholics, or those addicted to artificially sweetened or high sugar juices, to kick the habit, satisfy thirst and do the body a big favor. And homemade flavored waters can be quite elegant looking, a real guest-impresser.

1.  Choose a fruit and/or herb combo (preferably organic, only fresh, no dried or frozen), e.g., lemon-ginger; orange-lavender; lime-sage; strawberry-lemon-mint;  orange-lime; strawberry-pineapple; cucumber-lemon-celery; apple-cinnamon stick-red pear; kiwi-orange; watermelon-strawberry; lemon-mint-ginger-cucumber; apple-orange-cinnamon-clove; grapefruit-rosemary; lemon-raspberry-mint; blueberry-orange, ad infinitum.

2.  Wash, and cut up about a palmful of fruit and herbs. Remove citrus peel. Bruise herbs slightly to subtly increase the release of flavor. Softer fruits (e.g. citrus, strawberries) can be sliced fairly thin, halved or quartered. Harder fruits (e.g., apples) should be very thinly cut. Loose herbs or flowers (e.g. lavender buds, rose petals, dried hibiscus) can be put in a tea infuser or cheesecloth.

3.  Place in a pitcher, glass water bottle or mason jar. Fill with pure, cool or room temperature water (preferably distilled or reverse osmosis).

4.   Before placing in refrigerator, mix up or gently press fruits with the back of a wooden spoon to help release flavors. Allow to steep in the ’fridge for up to 24 hours, depending on how strong you like the flavor.

5.  If you haven’t drunk the water within 24 hours, strain out the solids and refrigerate up to 3 days. Cheers!

Warning: Instead of counting sheep at night, you might find yourself conjuring up new, exotic infused water combos!

This 1977 cartoon, from our F.A.C.T. archives, is by the great Herblock, multiple Pulitzer Prize-winning editorial cartoonist. Unfortunately, now, some 40 years later, the “cancer establishment” is still putting its big money and minds into finding that “miracle” blockbuster drug, instead of seriously addressing root causes.

Rhubarb

Rhubarb is a species of plant in the family Polygonaceae. They are herbaceous perennials growing from short, thick rhizomes. They have large leaves that are somewhat triangular, with long fleshy petioles. They have small flowers grouped in large compound leafy greenish-white to rose-red inflorescences.

Most commonly, rhubarb’s leaf stalks are cooked with sugar and used in pies and other desserts. A number of varieties have been domesticated for human consumption, most of which are recognized as Rheum x hybridum by the Royal Horticultural Society.

Rhubarb is usually considered to be a vegetable; however, in the United States, a New York court decided in 1947 that since it was used in the United States as a fruit, it was to be counted as a fruit for the purposes of regulations and duties. A side effect was a reduction on imported rhubarb tariffs, as tariffs were higher for vegetables than fruits.

THERAPEUTIC VALUE

Rhubarb can be used as a strong laxative. Its roots have been used as a laxative for at least 5,000 years.

The roots and stems are rich in anthraquinones, such as emodin and rhein. These substances are cathartic and laxative, which explains the sporadic use of rhubarb as a dieting aid. These molecules also contain sugars attached to them and are hence glycosides. Glycosides can retain water more thus adding to the cathartic action.

Rhubarb roots are used in traditional Chinese medicine; rhubarb also appears in medieval Arabic and European prescriptions.

The rhizomes (’roots’) contain stilbenoid compounds (including rhaponticin), which has shown to lower blood glucose levels in diabetic mice.

NUTRIENTS (per 100 grams)

Carbohydrates 4.54 g

Sugars 1.1 g

Dietary fibre 1.8 g

Fat 0.2 g

Protein 0.9 g

Water 93.61 g

Folate 7 μg

Vitamin C 8 mg

Vitamin E 0.27 mg

Vitamin K 29.3 μg

Calcium 86 mg

Iron 0.22 mg

Potassium 288 mg

Sodium 4 mg

Zinc 0.1 mg

Chicory

June 3, 2019

Chicory is closely related to endive. There are many varieties to chicory. They include green chicory, which is leafy; and radicchio, also a root chicory, which is red and white. Chicory is best when tossed in salad with other vegetables.

Green chicory is cultivated primarily in Europe, although varieties grow wild in Europe, Africa, Asia, and the Unite States. Belgium endive is primarily cultivated in Belgium and is prized for its delicate flavor. Radicchio is native to Italy and primarily grows there.

Radicchio is often sold with the root attached. If possible the root should be eaten because it is very good.

When selecting chicory, look for a fresh, crisp, green vegetable. Belgium endive, which looks like a tightly wrapped stalk, should be white or near white. Radicchio should be crisp and fresh.

THERAPEUTIC VALUE

Chicory is an alkaline food that is good in elimination diets. It is high in vitamin C.

Tea made from chicory roots and used as an enema is a wonderful remedy for increasing peristaltic action and getting the liver to work.

NUTRIENTS IN ONE POUND (greens only)

Calories: 74

Protein: 6.7 g

Fat: 1.1 g

Carbohydrates: 14.1 g

Calcium: 320 mg

Phosphorus: 149 mg

Iron: 3.3 mg

Vitamin A: 14,880 I.U.

Thiamine: .22 mg

Riboflavin: .37 mg

Niacin: 1.9 mg

Ascorbic acid: —

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